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Negotiation as a Constructivist Process: Perceptual Assumptions and Negotiator Choice in Simulated International Negotiations

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Abstract:

Effective negotiation strategies have long been a focus for scholars and practitioners alike. A negotiator can be assertive or passive, argumentative or collaborative, or employ other strategies in an attempt to secure their desired outcome. Some studies have suggested that the most effective techniques in negotiation include viewing the issue from the adversary's perspective, focusing on the problem versus personalities, seeking collaborative solutions versus compromise, and basing the discussions on objective criteria. In the real world of negotiation, however, individuals have limited information regarding effective negotiation styles, and thus it would rationally follow that their perceptions of what works - most often based on personal experience and assumptions - would determine the strategies they utilize. This raises the question of whether or not rational, self-interested individuals or negotiating teams employ what they perceive to be the most effective techniques to resolve a conflict. In other words, do their perceptions of effective negotiating match their actions? Furthermore, is such rationality, which is stereotypically more commonly associated with masculinity, more prevalent in male negotiators rather than female negotiators? Using data from the GlobalEd project at the University of Connecticut, this study investigates the link between perceptions and action in simulated international negotiations. This paper analyzes that data (coded from the content of their simulation messages) and matches that content with the negotiators' perceptions of what are effective negotiations strategies.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

negoti (124), assert (89), simul (82), interact (66), collab (60), process (59), creat (50), test (42), collabor (40), school (38), global (38), strategi (37), intern (35), style (33), pre (32), chang (30), post (29), use (27), effect (27), student (27), quarter (26),

Author's Keywords:

Negotiation, Constructivism, Experimental Methods, Identity
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Name: International Studies Association
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http://www.isanet.org


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MLA Citation:

Hudson, Natalie., Boyer, Mark. and Brown, Scott. "Negotiation as a Constructivist Process: Perceptual Assumptions and Negotiator Choice in Simulated International Negotiations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2009-05-25 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p69833_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hudson, N. F., Boyer, M. A. and Brown, S. W. , 2005-03-05 "Negotiation as a Constructivist Process: Perceptual Assumptions and Negotiator Choice in Simulated International Negotiations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-25 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p69833_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Effective negotiation strategies have long been a focus for scholars and practitioners alike. A negotiator can be assertive or passive, argumentative or collaborative, or employ other strategies in an attempt to secure their desired outcome. Some studies have suggested that the most effective techniques in negotiation include viewing the issue from the adversary's perspective, focusing on the problem versus personalities, seeking collaborative solutions versus compromise, and basing the discussions on objective criteria. In the real world of negotiation, however, individuals have limited information regarding effective negotiation styles, and thus it would rationally follow that their perceptions of what works - most often based on personal experience and assumptions - would determine the strategies they utilize. This raises the question of whether or not rational, self-interested individuals or negotiating teams employ what they perceive to be the most effective techniques to resolve a conflict. In other words, do their perceptions of effective negotiating match their actions? Furthermore, is such rationality, which is stereotypically more commonly associated with masculinity, more prevalent in male negotiators rather than female negotiators? Using data from the GlobalEd project at the University of Connecticut, this study investigates the link between perceptions and action in simulated international negotiations. This paper analyzes that data (coded from the content of their simulation messages) and matches that content with the negotiators' perceptions of what are effective negotiations strategies.

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Associated Document Available International Studies Association

Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 30
Word count: 7799
Text sample:
Discussion Draft 3/05 Negotiation as a Constructivist Process: Perceptual Assumptions and Negotiator Choice in Simulated International Negotiations Mark A. Boyer Natalie Florea Hudson Anat Niv-Solomon Brian Urlacher Scott W. Brown Paula Johnson Clarisse Lima GlobalEd Project www.globaled.uconn.edu University of Connecticut Mark A. Boyer is a professor of political science at the University of Connecticut and co-director of the GlobalEd Project. Natalie Florea Anat Niv-Solomon and Brian Urlacher are Ph.D. candidates in political science at the University of Connecticut. Scott
29 Sjöstedt Gunnar. (2002) "Negotiation on Trade and the Environment " in Victor A. Kremenyuk ed. International Negotiation 2nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass pp. 362-374. Smith Steve. (2001) "Reflectivist and Constructivist Approaches to International Theory " in John Baylis and Steve Smith eds. The Globalization of World Politics 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press pp. 224-252. Stein Janice Gross ed. (1989) Getting to the Table: The Processes of International Prenegotiation. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Sterling-Folker Jennifer. (2002) Theories


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