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Understanding Hegemonic Compliance: The Case of the US Civil Rights Movement and Contemporary Labor Rights Activism within the ILO

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Abstract:

How can we understand the possibilities of hegemonic compliance of international institutions, laws, and norms? Particularly in light of the United States' seemingly unabashed disregard for international law, understanding conditions that make hegemonic compliance possible seems to be of timely importance. Different theories of norm compliance, such as power and interest based theories, tend to predict general non-compliance of norms that may be costly to states, but I argue that these theories are insufficient to explain historical cases of changes of US state behavior leading to compliance. I compare the cases of the early Civil Rights movement post World War II (seeking racial equality) and the contemporary emerging trade union rights activism (seeking greater freedom of association and collective bargaining rights) within the US. I investigate how a case of successful hegemonic compliance (US Civil Rights) might inform the possibilities of hegemonic compliance in a currently unsuccessful case -- the domestic movement to change US labor laws to better protect workers' freedom of association rights, as embodied in the Conventions 87 and 98 of the International Labour Organisation.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

intern (214), right (191), us (183), labor (173), state (135), union (98), norm (89), worker (87), domest (80), complianc (74), convent (65), freedom (62), within (61), ilo (59), organ (59), american (58), human (54), law (54), case (53), argu (50), though (50),

Author's Keywords:

labor, human rights, international organizations, international law, civil rights, compliance
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Name: International Studies Association
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MLA Citation:

Kang, Susan. "Understanding Hegemonic Compliance: The Case of the US Civil Rights Movement and Contemporary Labor Rights Activism within the ILO" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2009-05-25 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p70384_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kang, S. , 2005-03-05 "Understanding Hegemonic Compliance: The Case of the US Civil Rights Movement and Contemporary Labor Rights Activism within the ILO" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-25 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p70384_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How can we understand the possibilities of hegemonic compliance of international institutions, laws, and norms? Particularly in light of the United States' seemingly unabashed disregard for international law, understanding conditions that make hegemonic compliance possible seems to be of timely importance. Different theories of norm compliance, such as power and interest based theories, tend to predict general non-compliance of norms that may be costly to states, but I argue that these theories are insufficient to explain historical cases of changes of US state behavior leading to compliance. I compare the cases of the early Civil Rights movement post World War II (seeking racial equality) and the contemporary emerging trade union rights activism (seeking greater freedom of association and collective bargaining rights) within the US. I investigate how a case of successful hegemonic compliance (US Civil Rights) might inform the possibilities of hegemonic compliance in a currently unsuccessful case -- the domestic movement to change US labor laws to better protect workers' freedom of association rights, as embodied in the Conventions 87 and 98 of the International Labour Organisation.

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Associated Document Available International Studies Association

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 56
Word count: 20566
Text sample:
Understanding Hegemonic Compliance: The Cases of International Labor Standards on Trade Union Rights in the US and American Civil Rights Movement in Comparative Perspective Susan L. Kang Department of Political Science University of Minnesota Presented at International Studies Association Conference March 2005 DRAFT (please ask for permission before citing) Kang 1 Given the recent upsurge in number of international treaties and regimes 1 questions of compliance with international norms and institutions have new found relevance. A more specific but
of State. 2001. "Labor Diplomacy: In Service of Democracy and Security." ACLD's Second Report to the Secretary of State and the President of the United States December 31 2001. http://www.state.gov/drl/rls/10043.htm von Potobsky Geraldo. 1998. "Freedom of association: the impact of Convention No. 87 and ILO Action". International Labour Review 137(2): 195-212. Waterman Peter and Jane Wills. 2001. "Trade Unions in Internationalism in the Age of Seattle" in Waterman and Wills (eds.) Space and the New Labour Internationalism. London: Blackwell


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