Citation

The Worlds Of Political Participation: Similarities and Differences in Discursive Participation and Political Behavior in the United States

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Political observers have sounded alarms about the
retreat of citizens from engagement in the process of electing
government officials
and influencing the legislative process by which government policy is
made. Rates of voter turnout and contacts with elected officials are at
or near new lows; Americans' sense of trust and confidence in
government officials' performance and responsiveness to their wants
and wishes are also relatively low. If citizens are disengaging from
standard forms of governmental politics, are they also disengaging from
other more basic forms of political participation - talking and
deliberating about policy issues that are matters of local, national,
and international concern? Indeed, civic deliberation is receiving
growing attention from scholars and other political observers. Yet, in
spite of the growing attention to civic deliberation, we know
relatively little about the extent and nature of public deliberation.
This paper will analyze the first national survey designed to examine
the extent, nature, and impact of civic deliberation. The survey
interviewed 1,501 adult Americans in 2003. In particular, we examine
what we call discursive participation - that is, the diverse ways in
which individuals discuss policy issues affecting the local, national,
and international communities in which they live -- from informal
conversations to organized forums whether in person or on the internet.
To appraise the significance of these activities, we compare the extent
and explanations for discursive participation with commonly studied
forms of political behavior (from voting to joining voluntary
associations).
The proposed paper will use quantitative methods to investigate two
specific questions. First, how widespread is participation in different
types of discursive practices? We examine in depth 4 forms of
deliberation - a telephone or in-person conversation about policy
issues; internet or instant messaging conversation; organized
deliberation on the internet; and organized face-to-face deliberation.
In particular, we explore the breadth of discursive participation - how
many distinct forms of deliberation do individuals engage in? We
compare the breadth of discursive participation with participation in 3
commonly studied forms of political participation - elite contacting
(e.g. writing a government officials or signing a petition), civic
participation (e.g. volunteering to work in an organization), and
electoral participation (i.e. voting or working for political party or
candidate).
Second, what explains engagement in discursive participation as
compared to standard forms of political behavior? In particular, we
explore two theories of political participation - one that focuses on
the impact of social and economic status and another that focuses on
civic engagement - such as membership in an organization.
The results from our analysis will provide important and new insights
into the extent and origins of discursive politics. Is discursive
participation more or less widespread than commonly studied forms of
political behavior? Does discursive participation result from the same
kinds of influences as standard forms of political behavior? Answers to
these questions are critical for expanding our empirical understanding
of public deliberation, a growing (but under-tilled) area of
interest.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: The Midwest Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82602_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Jacobs, Lawrence., Carpini, Michael. and Cook, Fay. "The Worlds Of Political Participation: Similarities and Differences in Discursive Participation and Political Behavior in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82602_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jacobs, L. R., Carpini, M. D. and Cook, F. L. , 2004-04-15 "The Worlds Of Political Participation: Similarities and Differences in Discursive Participation and Political Behavior in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82602_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Political observers have sounded alarms about the
retreat of citizens from engagement in the process of electing
government officials
and influencing the legislative process by which government policy is
made. Rates of voter turnout and contacts with elected officials are at
or near new lows; Americans' sense of trust and confidence in
government officials' performance and responsiveness to their wants
and wishes are also relatively low. If citizens are disengaging from
standard forms of governmental politics, are they also disengaging from
other more basic forms of political participation - talking and
deliberating about policy issues that are matters of local, national,
and international concern? Indeed, civic deliberation is receiving
growing attention from scholars and other political observers. Yet, in
spite of the growing attention to civic deliberation, we know
relatively little about the extent and nature of public deliberation.
This paper will analyze the first national survey designed to examine
the extent, nature, and impact of civic deliberation. The survey
interviewed 1,501 adult Americans in 2003. In particular, we examine
what we call discursive participation - that is, the diverse ways in
which individuals discuss policy issues affecting the local, national,
and international communities in which they live -- from informal
conversations to organized forums whether in person or on the internet.
To appraise the significance of these activities, we compare the extent
and explanations for discursive participation with commonly studied
forms of political behavior (from voting to joining voluntary
associations).
The proposed paper will use quantitative methods to investigate two
specific questions. First, how widespread is participation in different
types of discursive practices? We examine in depth 4 forms of
deliberation - a telephone or in-person conversation about policy
issues; internet or instant messaging conversation; organized
deliberation on the internet; and organized face-to-face deliberation.
In particular, we explore the breadth of discursive participation - how
many distinct forms of deliberation do individuals engage in? We
compare the breadth of discursive participation with participation in 3
commonly studied forms of political participation - elite contacting
(e.g. writing a government officials or signing a petition), civic
participation (e.g. volunteering to work in an organization), and
electoral participation (i.e. voting or working for political party or
candidate).
Second, what explains engagement in discursive participation as
compared to standard forms of political behavior? In particular, we
explore two theories of political participation - one that focuses on
the impact of social and economic status and another that focuses on
civic engagement - such as membership in an organization.
The results from our analysis will provide important and new insights
into the extent and origins of discursive politics. Is discursive
participation more or less widespread than commonly studied forms of
political behavior? Does discursive participation result from the same
kinds of influences as standard forms of political behavior? Answers to
these questions are critical for expanding our empirical understanding
of public deliberation, a growing (but under-tilled) area of
interest.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available The Midwest Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online


Similar Titles:
Political Participation, Political Events, and Social Mobilization in the Russia, Estonia, and the United States

Political Opportunity Structures, and Non-State Influence: The World Bank, Civil Society, and the United States

Toward a Holistic View of Political Participation: Explaining the Differences and Similarities Between Donors to Federal and State Candidates


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.