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The Natural Science Model in American Political Science: When Is It Natural, Why Is It Science, and Why Is It a Model?

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Abstract:

This paper is part of panel 031015: Questioning the
Applicability of the Natural Science Model to Political Science
In the spirit of contemporary science studies, as they might be
represented by Andrew Pickering, Karin Knorr Cetina, Bruno Latour, John
Law, or Michel Callon, this paper follows the actors into the mangle of
practices to examine critically the extraordinary understanding of, as
well as the high regard for, the natural science model in contemporary
American political science. Many critiques have been made of this
model, but it remains fairly well-entrenched in most subfields of the
discipline. By looking at this issue from the perspectives of actor
network theory, the social construction of knowledge, or the political
economy of knowledge production, this paper explores how and why the
natural science model continues to be accepted as natural, scientific,
and a model, especially in the modern American research university. It
makes these moves in order to point toward other understandings of how
political scientists as actors might, and, in fact, do operate in many
other different networks of knowledge production that do not perpetuate
the mythologies of model natural sciences as the natural science model
favored in the modern research university. It asks if, in fact, the
same clusters of educational and scientific institutions, which have
helped to create and sustain such model sciences, are themselves
changing. And, since they do seem to be changing considerably, then
American political scientists must rethink their disciplinary practices
as they enter their second century as an organized
professional-technical society of scholars.
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Association:
Name: The Midwest Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82946_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Luke, Timothy. "The Natural Science Model in American Political Science: When Is It Natural, Why Is It Science, and Why Is It a Model?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82946_index.html>

APA Citation:

Luke, T. , 2004-04-15 "The Natural Science Model in American Political Science: When Is It Natural, Why Is It Science, and Why Is It a Model?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p82946_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is part of panel 031015: Questioning the
Applicability of the Natural Science Model to Political Science
In the spirit of contemporary science studies, as they might be
represented by Andrew Pickering, Karin Knorr Cetina, Bruno Latour, John
Law, or Michel Callon, this paper follows the actors into the mangle of
practices to examine critically the extraordinary understanding of, as
well as the high regard for, the natural science model in contemporary
American political science. Many critiques have been made of this
model, but it remains fairly well-entrenched in most subfields of the
discipline. By looking at this issue from the perspectives of actor
network theory, the social construction of knowledge, or the political
economy of knowledge production, this paper explores how and why the
natural science model continues to be accepted as natural, scientific,
and a model, especially in the modern American research university. It
makes these moves in order to point toward other understandings of how
political scientists as actors might, and, in fact, do operate in many
other different networks of knowledge production that do not perpetuate
the mythologies of model natural sciences as the natural science model
favored in the modern research university. It asks if, in fact, the
same clusters of educational and scientific institutions, which have
helped to create and sustain such model sciences, are themselves
changing. And, since they do seem to be changing considerably, then
American political scientists must rethink their disciplinary practices
as they enter their second century as an organized
professional-technical society of scholars.

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Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available The Midwest Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online


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