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Cooperation as an Interest Group Strategy: Implementation of Sections 9 & 10 of the Endangered Species Act (1982, as Amended)

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Abstract:

Group influence is an important element of study within political science. How much influence do organized interests exert within the policy process? Is this influence a normatively “good” thing, i.e., linking citizens to government? Or is it a “bad” thing? This study steps back and examines the question from the perspective of how groups might use their resources to influence public policy. I do so not at the legislative or agenda-setting phase of public policy, but at the implementation of policy, where agency officials have discretion to design rules and negotiate agreements without the scrutiny of elected officials. I argue that groups are active in securing the benefits or ameliorating the effects of legislation and devise cooperative or conflictual strategies to affect this process.

Measuring cooperation along a continuum, I argue the degree of cooperation groups exhibit is affected by the policy context, in addition to group resources. The policy context shapes the relative degree of information and access available to groups. Groups lacking access and specialized information regarding the process will fight the process more visibly than those groups with these resources.

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group (200), cooper (80), variabl (67), polici (61), plan (59), process (54), increas (49), interest (46), polit (42), public (42), strategi (40), conflict (39), resourc (39), uncertainti (38), inform (37), staff (36), satisfact (34), use (32), capac (32), behavior (31), access (31),
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Name: The Midwest Political Science Association
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http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


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MLA Citation:

Robbins, Suzanne. "Cooperation as an Interest Group Strategy: Implementation of Sections 9 & 10 of the Endangered Species Act (1982, as Amended)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p83156_index.html>

APA Citation:

Robbins, S. M. , 2004-04-15 "Cooperation as an Interest Group Strategy: Implementation of Sections 9 & 10 of the Endangered Species Act (1982, as Amended)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p83156_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Group influence is an important element of study within political science. How much influence do organized interests exert within the policy process? Is this influence a normatively “good” thing, i.e., linking citizens to government? Or is it a “bad” thing? This study steps back and examines the question from the perspective of how groups might use their resources to influence public policy. I do so not at the legislative or agenda-setting phase of public policy, but at the implementation of policy, where agency officials have discretion to design rules and negotiate agreements without the scrutiny of elected officials. I argue that groups are active in securing the benefits or ameliorating the effects of legislation and devise cooperative or conflictual strategies to affect this process.

Measuring cooperation along a continuum, I argue the degree of cooperation groups exhibit is affected by the policy context, in addition to group resources. The policy context shapes the relative degree of information and access available to groups. Groups lacking access and specialized information regarding the process will fight the process more visibly than those groups with these resources.

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Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available The Midwest Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 25
Word count: 8981
Text sample:
Cooperation as an Interest Group Strategy: Implementation of Sections 9 & 10 of the Endangered Species Act (1982 as Amended) Suzanne M. Robbins Ph. D. Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy 100 Lloyd Cassity Building Morehead State University Morehead KY 40351 606.783.5432 s.robbins@morehead-st.edu Abstract Group influence is an important element of study within political science. How much influence do organized interests exert within the policy process? Is this influence a normatively “good” thing i.e. linking citizens to government?
in Environmental-Economic Disputes. American Behavioral Scientist 42 (8):1350-1367. U.S. GAO. 2001. Fish and Wildlife Service: Challenges to Managing the Carlsbad California 23 Field Office's Endangered Species Workload. Washington DC: United States General Accounting Office. U.S. House of Representatives. 1999. Testimony at the Field Hearing on the Enforcement of the ESA before the Committee on Resources July 9 1999. Watchman Laura Hood. 1998. Frayed Safety Nets: Conservation Planning Under the Endangered Species Act. Washington DC: Defenders of Wildlife. 24


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