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Patriotism or Nationalism?: The New York Times' Discourse of American National Identity After 9/11

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Abstract:

As a general concept, national identity has two different manifestations: patriotism and nationalism. The former connotes pride and love for a country and the latter refers to a chauvinistic arrogance and desire for dominance in international relations.

This study examines the role of a national newspaper in the presentation of American national identity by analyzing the New York Times’ editorials after September 11th, 2001. The critical discourse analysis of the New York Times’ editorials over the three months after 9/11 reveals that the New York Times’ presentation of American national identity was a dynamic process. Both patriotism and nationalism were presented in the New York Times’ editorials, but with different priorities in different periods.

Interestingly, two categories were almost equally emphasized in the first month after the terrorist attack. This shows that the New York Times’ presentation of national identity in editorials was quite balanced. Both war and criticism were given considerable attention. During the second month, the difference between patriotism and nationalism became notable, with the themes of nationalism accounting for approximately twice as much as those of patriotic themes. There was a shift in the presentation of national identity from nationalism to patriotism over the last month of this study. Criticism of the government became the most prominent theme in the presentation of American national identity. Overall, a shift from nationalism to patriotism can be identified over the three-month time frame. War, fear, reconstruction, and criticism were the four major themes of the presentation of American national identity.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

nation (177), patriot (79), time (77), ident (67), editori (59), war (57), theme (46), new (42), month (42), american (42), york (39), u.s (36), 2001 (32), critic (31), countri (30), present (30), terror (30), attack (29), group (26), world (24), terrorist (23),

Author's Keywords:

Patriotism, Nationalism, National Identity, The New York Times, Discourse Analysis, 9/11
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90266_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Wei, Lu., Roy, Sudeshna., Wells, Jessica., Rethen, Mariana. and Huang, Chao-Tsung. "Patriotism or Nationalism?: The New York Times' Discourse of American National Identity After 9/11" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90266_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wei, L. , Roy, S. , Wells, J. , Rethen, M. and Huang, C. , 2006-06-16 "Patriotism or Nationalism?: The New York Times' Discourse of American National Identity After 9/11" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany Online <PDF>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90266_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As a general concept, national identity has two different manifestations: patriotism and nationalism. The former connotes pride and love for a country and the latter refers to a chauvinistic arrogance and desire for dominance in international relations.

This study examines the role of a national newspaper in the presentation of American national identity by analyzing the New York Times’ editorials after September 11th, 2001. The critical discourse analysis of the New York Times’ editorials over the three months after 9/11 reveals that the New York Times’ presentation of American national identity was a dynamic process. Both patriotism and nationalism were presented in the New York Times’ editorials, but with different priorities in different periods.

Interestingly, two categories were almost equally emphasized in the first month after the terrorist attack. This shows that the New York Times’ presentation of national identity in editorials was quite balanced. Both war and criticism were given considerable attention. During the second month, the difference between patriotism and nationalism became notable, with the themes of nationalism accounting for approximately twice as much as those of patriotic themes. There was a shift in the presentation of national identity from nationalism to patriotism over the last month of this study. Criticism of the government became the most prominent theme in the presentation of American national identity. Overall, a shift from nationalism to patriotism can be identified over the three-month time frame. War, fear, reconstruction, and criticism were the four major themes of the presentation of American national identity.

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