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A Network Perspective of Communication Capital and New Venture Creation in Organizations
Unformatted Document Text:  processes of the companies (Jones, 1983). Interpretivists rely on in-depth interviews, observation, and document review as techniques for collecting data (e.g., Rock, 1979; Jones, 1983). This approach also informed the design of the field study and data analyses. Interpretivists have a marked suspicion of hypothesis-testing and theory-verification (Blumer, 1969; Denzin, 1983; Martin & Turner, 1986; Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Data Collection Empirical data were collected through qualitative methods and using an insider/outsider approach (Evered & Louis, 1981; Louis & Bartunek, 1992) that included five techniques: (1) repeated, extensive, on-site, personal, semi-structured interviews with key organizational actors; (2) in-situ shadowing and observations, and (3) extensive reviews of documents and artifacts; (4) field impression analysis; and (5) supplementary interviews of scholars at the local university and research institute. The documents related both to the operations of the company and to then-current trends in the business and societal climates within which the enterprise operated. Data came from the insider-entrepreneurs intimately involved in micro-transitions, as well as from an outsider-observer of the developing situation.Interviews: The field study was a "current-time-study" focusing on events that were "real-time", unfolding as the insiders/managers and the outsider/researcher experienced and made-sense of them. In all, twenty-two executives/managers across the company were repeatedly interviewed in person and observed at their work sites. Interview data were collected mostly in the Polish language (English was used by several interviewees). The researcher spoke and read Polish and also had detailed familiarity with the locality and conditions of the city and its surrounding region as well as Polish culture. The interviews included semi-structured questions. The face-to-face interviews with the key managers were conducted individually in the interviewee’s company and lasted between two and three hours each. All interviews were repeated once a year and were also conducted after the process of privatization was completed and new organization based on private ownership by employees was in force. Interviewees told their stories with detailed clarity about changes in the company and about their subjective observations. One opening question was put to all interviewees: What does this dramatic change, and the fact that the company has been privatized mean to you and how do you perceive it? Interviewees described their broad understandings of the novelties imposed by the new private status of the company. Respondents related their own interpretations of events. The privacy of the interviews, guaranteed by the researcher, helped interviewees articulate their personal interpretations of privatization process. The interviews, as well as often-lengthy discourses by the respondents, were tape-recorded and transcribed, resulting in extensive materials. Document-reviews used materials from the company as well as other sources, for example, working papers from research institutes, information 8

Authors: Aggestam, Maria.
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processes of the companies (Jones, 1983). Interpretivists rely on in-depth
interviews, observation, and document review as techniques for collecting data
(e.g., Rock, 1979; Jones, 1983). This approach also informed the design of the
field study and data analyses. Interpretivists have a marked suspicion of
hypothesis-testing and theory-verification (Blumer, 1969; Denzin, 1983; Martin
& Turner, 1986; Glaser & Strauss, 1967).
Data Collection
Empirical data were collected through qualitative methods and using an
insider/outsider approach (Evered & Louis, 1981; Louis & Bartunek, 1992) that
included five techniques: (1) repeated, extensive, on-site, personal, semi-
structured interviews with key organizational actors; (2) in-situ shadowing and
observations, and (3) extensive reviews of documents and artifacts; (4) field
impression analysis; and (5) supplementary interviews of scholars at the local
university and research institute. The documents related both to the operations
of the company and to then-current trends in the business and societal climates
within which the enterprise operated. Data came from the insider-entrepreneurs
intimately involved in micro-transitions, as well as from an outsider-observer of
the developing situation.
Interviews: The field study was a "current-time-study" focusing on events that
were "real-time", unfolding as the insiders/managers and the outsider/researcher
experienced and made-sense of them. In all, twenty-two executives/managers
across the company were repeatedly interviewed in person and observed at their
work sites. Interview data were collected mostly in the Polish language
(English was used by several interviewees). The researcher spoke and read
Polish and also had detailed familiarity with the locality and conditions of the
city and its surrounding region as well as Polish culture. The interviews
included semi-structured questions. The face-to-face interviews with the key
managers were conducted individually in the interviewee’s company and lasted
between two and three hours each. All interviews were repeated once a year
and were also conducted after the process of privatization was completed and
new organization based on private ownership by employees was in force.
Interviewees told their stories with detailed clarity about changes in the
company and about their subjective observations. One opening question was
put to all interviewees: What does this dramatic change, and the fact that the
company has been privatized mean to you and how do you perceive it?
Interviewees described their broad understandings of the novelties imposed by
the new private status of the company. Respondents related their own
interpretations of events. The privacy of the interviews, guaranteed by the
researcher, helped interviewees articulate their personal interpretations of
privatization process. The interviews, as well as often-lengthy discourses by
the respondents, were tape-recorded and transcribed, resulting in extensive
materials. Document-reviews used materials from the company as well as other
sources, for example, working papers from research institutes, information
8


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