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Embracing Technologies of Domination: The Rise of Popular Imperialism in the U.S., 1898-1904

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Abstract:

Boosted by technologies of domination and representation, sometimes in combination, patriotic fervor over the Cuban-Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars drew from sources high and low, official and unofficial, and contributed to processes of identity re-creation oriented toward both Americans and the island peoples they conquered. The re-positioning of martial affairs at the center of American consciousness served to strengthen the role of the federal government and to buttress a new model of national identity. The manner in which the latter task was achieved through popular culture is the central concern of this paper. From the paroxysm of patriotism inspired by the sinking of the Spanish fleet at Manila Bay to the demonization of new enemies in visual media, cultural producers in the United States found in the experience of conflict overseas a rich vein of popular discourse. Mining from popular attitudes about military prowess and racial hierarchy a steady stream of songs, cartoons, jokes and excited rhetoric, artists, sheet-music purveyors and humorists packaged war – a grim experience most Americans had sworn off after the national catastrophe of a generation before – as a form of amusement. Safely removed from American soil, the fighting in Cuba and the Philippines offered consumers of popular culture an opportunity for vicarious thrills and a way to reconceptualize their place in the world.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (67), popular (46), war (41), patriot (35), dewey (33), nation (33), philippin (27), new (26), press (22), 1898 (17), state (17), see (16), york (15), filipino (15), cultur (14), univers (14), 1899 (13), unit (13), could (13), world (13), public (13),

Author's Keywords:

popular culture, imperialism, technology, race, identity, patriotism
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Vaughan, Christopher. "Embracing Technologies of Domination: The Rise of Popular Imperialism in the U.S., 1898-1904" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93304_index.html>

APA Citation:

Vaughan, C. , 2006-06-16 "Embracing Technologies of Domination: The Rise of Popular Imperialism in the U.S., 1898-1904" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany Online <PDF>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93304_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Boosted by technologies of domination and representation, sometimes in combination, patriotic fervor over the Cuban-Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars drew from sources high and low, official and unofficial, and contributed to processes of identity re-creation oriented toward both Americans and the island peoples they conquered. The re-positioning of martial affairs at the center of American consciousness served to strengthen the role of the federal government and to buttress a new model of national identity. The manner in which the latter task was achieved through popular culture is the central concern of this paper. From the paroxysm of patriotism inspired by the sinking of the Spanish fleet at Manila Bay to the demonization of new enemies in visual media, cultural producers in the United States found in the experience of conflict overseas a rich vein of popular discourse. Mining from popular attitudes about military prowess and racial hierarchy a steady stream of songs, cartoons, jokes and excited rhetoric, artists, sheet-music purveyors and humorists packaged war – a grim experience most Americans had sworn off after the national catastrophe of a generation before – as a form of amusement. Safely removed from American soil, the fighting in Cuba and the Philippines offered consumers of popular culture an opportunity for vicarious thrills and a way to reconceptualize their place in the world.

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