Citation

Auditory and Visual Characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech by Japanese and Australian English Mothers

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In infant-directed speech (IDS) adults exaggerate speech (extended pitch range, longer vowels, hyperarticulated vowels etc.) more than in adult-directed speech (ADS) (Burnham et al., 2002). While reports that such exaggerations occur across languages - Swedish, Russian, and English (Kuhl et al., 1997), Thai and English (Kitamura et al., 2002), and Japanese and English (Andruski et al., 1999) - argue for universality of this phenomenon, other results suggest cross-language differences – less IDS vs. ADS pitch elevation in British than American English (Shute & Wheldall, 1989), and lack of IDS vs. ADS vowel space difference in Norwegian (Englund & Behne, 2005).
This study was motivated by the lack of universality in auditory-visual speech perception between Japanese and English adults. While there is pervasive influence of visual information in speech perception whenever it is available (McGurk & MacDonlad, 1977), this is stronger in English than Japanese adults (Sekiyama & Tohkura, 1993). This cross-language difference has its origins between 6 and 8 years when English, but not Japanese, children increase their use of visual speech information (Sekiyama & Burnham, 2004). Is it possible that this effect has its origin in parents’ speech to their in infants?
A Japanese mother and an Australian English mother were video-recorded speaking to their 5-month-olds, and an adult, using four dolls - ‘Boobaa’, ‘Baabaa’, ‘Biibaa’, ‘Buubaa’. Acoustic and phonetic analyses of these words showed that mothers produced longer vowels in IDS than ADS, with the difference most pronounced for /o:/ in English and /a:/ and /u:/ in Japanese. Mean and range fundamental frequency (pitch) was higher in IDS than ADS in English, but for Japanese only the mean was higher. Quadrilateral vowel areas calculated from the first and second formant values of the /o:/, /i:/, /a:/, and /u:/ vowels revealed vowel hyperarticulation in IDS both in Australian English and Japanese, though more so in Japanese. Not surprisingly, given the relative number of vowels (5 in Japanese, 14 in English), Japanese vowel space was generally larger, and interestingly, Japanese IDS showed less overlap between individual vowel ellipses than did English IDS. It is possible that the differences in Japanese and English use of visual information in speech perception are due to the greater ease with which Japanese vowels can be perceived via auditory-only information, thus requiring less use of visual information. Further data collection, and further analysis of the degree of visual hyperarticulation in speech is progressing.

Author's Keywords:

infant-directed speech, auditory-visual, speech perception, speech production, cross-language
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies
URL:
http://www.isisweb.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94002_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Burnham, Denis., Sekiyama, Kaoru. and Tsukada, Kimiko. "Auditory and Visual Characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech by Japanese and Australian English Mothers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan, Jun 19, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94002_index.html>

APA Citation:

Burnham, D. , Sekiyama, K. and Tsukada, K. , 2006-06-19 "Auditory and Visual Characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech by Japanese and Australian English Mothers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94002_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Poster
Abstract: In infant-directed speech (IDS) adults exaggerate speech (extended pitch range, longer vowels, hyperarticulated vowels etc.) more than in adult-directed speech (ADS) (Burnham et al., 2002). While reports that such exaggerations occur across languages - Swedish, Russian, and English (Kuhl et al., 1997), Thai and English (Kitamura et al., 2002), and Japanese and English (Andruski et al., 1999) - argue for universality of this phenomenon, other results suggest cross-language differences – less IDS vs. ADS pitch elevation in British than American English (Shute & Wheldall, 1989), and lack of IDS vs. ADS vowel space difference in Norwegian (Englund & Behne, 2005).
This study was motivated by the lack of universality in auditory-visual speech perception between Japanese and English adults. While there is pervasive influence of visual information in speech perception whenever it is available (McGurk & MacDonlad, 1977), this is stronger in English than Japanese adults (Sekiyama & Tohkura, 1993). This cross-language difference has its origins between 6 and 8 years when English, but not Japanese, children increase their use of visual speech information (Sekiyama & Burnham, 2004). Is it possible that this effect has its origin in parents’ speech to their in infants?
A Japanese mother and an Australian English mother were video-recorded speaking to their 5-month-olds, and an adult, using four dolls - ‘Boobaa’, ‘Baabaa’, ‘Biibaa’, ‘Buubaa’. Acoustic and phonetic analyses of these words showed that mothers produced longer vowels in IDS than ADS, with the difference most pronounced for /o:/ in English and /a:/ and /u:/ in Japanese. Mean and range fundamental frequency (pitch) was higher in IDS than ADS in English, but for Japanese only the mean was higher. Quadrilateral vowel areas calculated from the first and second formant values of the /o:/, /i:/, /a:/, and /u:/ vowels revealed vowel hyperarticulation in IDS both in Australian English and Japanese, though more so in Japanese. Not surprisingly, given the relative number of vowels (5 in Japanese, 14 in English), Japanese vowel space was generally larger, and interestingly, Japanese IDS showed less overlap between individual vowel ellipses than did English IDS. It is possible that the differences in Japanese and English use of visual information in speech perception are due to the greater ease with which Japanese vowels can be perceived via auditory-only information, thus requiring less use of visual information. Further data collection, and further analysis of the degree of visual hyperarticulation in speech is progressing.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.


Similar Titles:
Developmental change of Japanese infants’ preference for infant-directed speech in non-native languages

Differences of acoustic characteristics between mothers' singing and speech to infants

Is Lexical Tone Exaggeration in Mandarin Infant-Directed Speech Related to Infants’ Speech Perception?

Speech rate in infant-directed speech in Japanese is NOT slower than adult-directed speech.

Attention to Infant-Directed Versus Adult-Directed Speech in Normal-Hearing Infants and Hearing-Impaired Infants with Cochlear Implants


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.