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Balancing Work and Home: The Relationship between Quality Time and Work-Family Conflict
Unformatted Document Text:  Work Hours Interestingly, the results suggest that for fathers, working many hours (over 50 hours a week) reduces the level of work family conflict, although this effect is statistically significant only for the first measure of ‘feeling trapped by responsibilities as a parent.” Moreover, for fathers, working fewer hours increases work-family conflict, but this effect is statistically insignificant. The results are different for mothers. Working no hours reduces work-family conflict among mothers, and working increases work-family conflict, but these effects are statistically insignificant. The findings suggest that mothers’ work-family conflict is not significantly affected by spouses’ work hours, but that for fathers, having a wife who is not active in the labor force reduces work-family conflict. These results may reflect an emotional benefit of having a clear division of labor in their household, whereby the mother is responsible for family production, the father is responsible for market production, and both parents feel less work-family conflict than parents where both parents are employed. In parallel, these findings suggest that work-family conflict is stronger for parents who are trying to balance work and family than for mothers out of the labor force or for fathers who have selected to work so many hours it is likely they do not feel as committed to their parental role. Family Characteristics and Quality Time The results suggest that parents with Child-Centered approach to quality time and parents with Time-Intensive approach experience overall lower levels of work-family conflict than parents with a Structured-Planning approach. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis. Interestingly and contrary to our expectations, spouses’ agreement on approach to quality time does not seem to affect parents’ level of work-family conflict. The effect of number of children on work-family conflict is inconsistent among our measures and is mostly statistically insignificant. Spouse Level of Work-family Conflict 15

Authors: Snyder, Karrie. and Lewin, Alisa.
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Work Hours
Interestingly, the results suggest that for fathers, working many hours (over 50 hours a
week) reduces the level of work family conflict, although this effect is statistically significant
only for the first measure of ‘feeling trapped by responsibilities as a parent.” Moreover, for
fathers, working fewer hours increases work-family conflict, but this effect is statistically
insignificant. The results are different for mothers. Working no hours reduces work-family
conflict among mothers, and working increases work-family conflict, but these effects are
statistically insignificant. The findings suggest that mothers’ work-family conflict is not
significantly affected by spouses’ work hours, but that for fathers, having a wife who is not
active in the labor force reduces work-family conflict. These results may reflect an emotional
benefit of having a clear division of labor in their household, whereby the mother is responsible
for family production, the father is responsible for market production, and both parents feel less
work-family conflict than parents where both parents are employed. In parallel, these findings
suggest that work-family conflict is stronger for parents who are trying to balance work and
family than for mothers out of the labor force or for fathers who have selected to work so many
hours it is likely they do not feel as committed to their parental role.
Family Characteristics and Quality Time
The results suggest that parents with Child-Centered approach to quality time and parents
with Time-Intensive approach experience overall lower levels of work-family conflict than
parents with a Structured-Planning approach. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis.
Interestingly and contrary to our expectations, spouses’ agreement on approach to quality time
does not seem to affect parents’ level of work-family conflict.
The effect of number of children on work-family conflict is inconsistent among our
measures and is mostly statistically insignificant.
Spouse Level of Work-family Conflict
15


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