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Making Noise: The Politics of Aceh and East Timor in the Diaspora
Unformatted Document Text:  7 (Bernadino Siry) Luís Cardoso recalls that the exiled political leaders of the UDT “kept a safe distance from the scholarship holders” 12 and that Vale do Jamor in the early years was an “anti-Fretlin zone.” 13 Others remember more communication and interdependence. There was a lot of pressure on us as university graduates that we must do something. The East Timorese people in the camps were asking us to do something. We also felt we should do something for those people and for East Timor…Our first job then was as facilitators, we helped them get integrated, we helped them because we spoke Portuguese. We were students so we could help. There was not much help from the Portuguese community… At that time it was very difficult to get into Portuguese universities. At that time one of our activities was to lobby the Portuguese government to allow any East Timorese [in Portugal] that finished high school to enter university—giving them opportunities and preparing them for work in an independent Timor. We succeeded. (Bernadino Siry) There was a smaller number of East Timorese in Macau and Mozambique (former Portuguese colonies) and later in the United States, Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Despite being small, the group in Mozambique was significant because it included the members of the Fretilin Central Committee outside East Timor, including important political figures of both the diaspora and the East Timorese independence struggle, Mari Alkatiri, Abílio Araújo, Rogério Lobato, José Luis Guterres and José Ramos-Horta 14 who found himself in Australia at the time of the Indonesian invasion and later went to Mozambique. There was also some movement among these leaders in the diaspora. Ramos-Horta was often on the move, he is named as a leader in the diaspora in Portugal, Mozambique, the U.S., and Australia. Abílio Araújo also spent time in Portugal as well as Mozambique. Another political and community leader, Manuel Tilman was based in Portugal and Macao. Agio Pereira was among the East Timorese students in Portugal at the time of the Indonesian invasion. Pereira later emigrated to Australia where he became director of the East Timor Relief Association. 12 Ibid., p. 110 13 Ibid., p. 128 14 David Scott, Last Flight Out of Dili: Memoirs of An Accidental Activist in the Triumph of East Timor, Melbourne: Pluto Press (2005): 76.

Authors: Fallon, Karla.
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7
(Bernadino Siry)

Luís Cardoso recalls that the exiled political leaders of the UDT “kept a safe distance from the
scholarship holders”
12
and that Vale do Jamor in the early years was an “anti-Fretlin zone.”
13
Others remember more communication and interdependence.
There was a lot of pressure on us as university graduates that we must do something. The
East Timorese people in the camps were asking us to do something. We also felt we should
do something for those people and for East Timor…Our first job then was as facilitators, we
helped them get integrated, we helped them because we spoke Portuguese. We were students
so we could help. There was not much help from the Portuguese community… At that time it
was very difficult to get into Portuguese universities. At that time one of our activities was to
lobby the Portuguese government to allow any East Timorese [in Portugal] that finished
high school to enter university—giving them opportunities and preparing them for work in an
independent Timor. We succeeded.
(Bernadino Siry)
There was a smaller number of East Timorese in Macau and Mozambique (former Portuguese
colonies) and later in the United States, Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Despite being
small, the group in Mozambique was significant because it included the members of the Fretilin
Central Committee outside East Timor, including important political figures of both the diaspora
and the East Timorese independence struggle, Mari Alkatiri, Abílio Araújo, Rogério Lobato,
José Luis Guterres and José Ramos-Horta
14
who found himself in Australia at the time of the
Indonesian invasion and later went to Mozambique. There was also some movement among
these leaders in the diaspora. Ramos-Horta was often on the move, he is named as a leader in the
diaspora in Portugal, Mozambique, the U.S., and Australia. Abílio Araújo also spent time in
Portugal as well as Mozambique. Another political and community leader, Manuel Tilman was
based in Portugal and Macao. Agio Pereira was among the East Timorese students in Portugal at
the time of the Indonesian invasion. Pereira later emigrated to Australia where he became
director of the East Timor Relief Association.
12
Ibid., p. 110
13
Ibid., p. 128
14
David Scott, Last Flight Out of Dili: Memoirs of An Accidental Activist in the Triumph of East Timor, Melbourne:
Pluto Press (2005): 76.


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