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Does Cyber-Proximity Matter? Social Media Network Exposure and Cross-National Protest Diffusion: Evidence From Event History Analysis of Arab Spring 2010—2011

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Abstract:

A majority of diffusion studies on social movement has been conducted within a single system, with few analyzing diffusion in a cross-national context. This study takes an event history analytic approach to systematically explore cross-national contagion during Arab Spring. In particular, this study examines cyber-proximity effect on the protest spillover across 16 countries. Adopting Valente’s (1995) threshold model, the study operationalizes “social media network exposure” and examines its effect as a diffusion variable. The results show the evidence of contemporaneous contagion effect spread via social media network, although no lagged effect is found. The author contextualizes discussions within the scholarship of social movement/protest diffusion, democracy domino theory, and social media-driven collective actions. Future directions are recommended concerning how to delve further into the evidence of SMNE’s temporal contagion effect, diversify the measurements of online network exposure, and apply a social-media-proximity based diffusion modeling to other cases of social movements.
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Association:
Name: ICA's 66th Annual Conference
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105471_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Kwon, K. Hazel. "Does Cyber-Proximity Matter? Social Media Network Exposure and Cross-National Protest Diffusion: Evidence From Event History Analysis of Arab Spring 2010—2011" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 <Not Available>. 2016-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105471_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kwon, K. , 2016-06-09 "Does Cyber-Proximity Matter? Social Media Network Exposure and Cross-National Protest Diffusion: Evidence From Event History Analysis of Arab Spring 2010—2011" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2016-12-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105471_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A majority of diffusion studies on social movement has been conducted within a single system, with few analyzing diffusion in a cross-national context. This study takes an event history analytic approach to systematically explore cross-national contagion during Arab Spring. In particular, this study examines cyber-proximity effect on the protest spillover across 16 countries. Adopting Valente’s (1995) threshold model, the study operationalizes “social media network exposure” and examines its effect as a diffusion variable. The results show the evidence of contemporaneous contagion effect spread via social media network, although no lagged effect is found. The author contextualizes discussions within the scholarship of social movement/protest diffusion, democracy domino theory, and social media-driven collective actions. Future directions are recommended concerning how to delve further into the evidence of SMNE’s temporal contagion effect, diversify the measurements of online network exposure, and apply a social-media-proximity based diffusion modeling to other cases of social movements.


Similar Titles:
Innovativeness, Social Network and the Adoption of Statistical Innovations: The Diffusion of Event History Analysis in Sociology

Automated Language Processing: Exploring the Relationship of Social Media and Conflict in a Comparative Analysis of Native Language Arabic Social Media and Conflict Events Reported in New Media


 
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