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Embodied Health Movements: A New Conceptual Framework For Social Movement Research

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Abstract:

Social movements organized around health-related issues are a major force for social change, yet social movement scholars have not explicitly addressed those movements. Health social movements (HSMs) are centrally organized around health, and address (a) access to, or provision, of health care services; (b) disease, illness experience, disability and contested illness; and/or (c) health inequality and inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality. HSMs can be subdivided into three categories: Health Access Movements seek equitable access to health care and improved provision of health care services; Embodied Health Movements (EHMs) address disease, disability, or illness experience by challenging science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention; and, Constituency-Based Health Movements address health inequality and health inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality differences. These groups address disproportionate outcomes and oversight by the scientific community and/or weak science. This article focuses on embodied health movements, which differ from other health social movements, and from most other social movements, by possessing the combination of three features: 1) they introduce the biological body to social movements, especially with regard to the embodied experience of people with the disease, 2) they typically include challenges to existing medical/scientific knowledge and practice, and 3) they often involve activists collaborating with scientists and health professionals in pursuing treatment, prevention, research, and expanded funding. This article develops a conceptual framework for understanding embodied health movements, and provides a capsule example of one such movement, the environmental breast cancer movement.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

movement (230), social (141), health (134), ill (85), ehm (77), diseas (69), breast (64), cancer (60), environment (58), scienc (56), ident (52), activist (51), boundari (50), collect (48), research (46), experi (46), scientif (43), medic (41), women (35), knowledg (33), also (31),

Author's Keywords:

social movements, health advocacy
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Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106488_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Brown, Phil., Zavestoski, Stephen., McCormick, Sabrina., Mayer, Brian., Morello-Frosch, Rachel. and Gasior, Rebecca. "Embodied Health Movements: A New Conceptual Framework For Social Movement Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106488_index.html>

APA Citation:

Brown, P. , Zavestoski, S. M., McCormick, S. B., Mayer, B. M., Morello-Frosch, R. and Gasior, R. J. , 2003-08-16 "Embodied Health Movements: A New Conceptual Framework For Social Movement Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106488_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social movements organized around health-related issues are a major force for social change, yet social movement scholars have not explicitly addressed those movements. Health social movements (HSMs) are centrally organized around health, and address (a) access to, or provision, of health care services; (b) disease, illness experience, disability and contested illness; and/or (c) health inequality and inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality. HSMs can be subdivided into three categories: Health Access Movements seek equitable access to health care and improved provision of health care services; Embodied Health Movements (EHMs) address disease, disability, or illness experience by challenging science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention; and, Constituency-Based Health Movements address health inequality and health inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class and/or sexuality differences. These groups address disproportionate outcomes and oversight by the scientific community and/or weak science. This article focuses on embodied health movements, which differ from other health social movements, and from most other social movements, by possessing the combination of three features: 1) they introduce the biological body to social movements, especially with regard to the embodied experience of people with the disease, 2) they typically include challenges to existing medical/scientific knowledge and practice, and 3) they often involve activists collaborating with scientists and health professionals in pursuing treatment, prevention, research, and expanded funding. This article develops a conceptual framework for understanding embodied health movements, and provides a capsule example of one such movement, the environmental breast cancer movement.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 34
Word count: 9465
Text sample:
EMBODIED HEALTH MOVE ENTS: M A NEW CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR SOCIAL MOVEMENT RESEARCH Phil Brown1 Stephen Zavestoski2 Sabrina McCormick 1 Brian Mayer1 Rachel Morello-Frosch1 Rebecca Gasior1 (1Brown University 2University of San Francisco) This research is supported by grants to the first author from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research Program (Grant #036273) and the National Science Foundation Program in Social Dimensions of Engineering Science and Technology (Grant # SES 9975518). We thank Meadow Linder
some illness sufferers do choose to exit the system of Western medical care by seeking alternative and complementary therapies. As this group of individuals represents a small minority of the ill who are seeking to restore their health we choose to focus on the dependence on science that characterizes those who turn to mainstream medical care providers. 4 Though we lack the space to discuss this here EHMs tend to rely on the Internet as a mobilization tool. The


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