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“Hey, Purritty Gurrl! Black Stereotyping: Social Relations among African American and West Indian College Students

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Abstract:

Stereotyping exists between African-Americans and West Indians in college that may affect student social development based on experiences in and outside the classroom. The conceptualization of voluntary/involuntary minority groupings helps to classify and contextualize the differences between West Indians and African-Americans in college that manifest as racial tensions between the groups. This research explores the extent to which attitudes and stereotypes of intra-racial prejudice influence social interactions between African-American and West Indian college students. Using a mixed method approach, African American and West Indian students from a public university in Metropolitan New York are administered a questionnaire, a racial stereotyping survey, followed by mixed-member focus group interviews. Preliminary findings suggest that stereotypes influence social relationships between West Indians and African-Americans. West Indians have been stereotyped as “jack of all trades and master of none, arrogant, thrifty, pushy and clannish”. African-Americans have been stereotyped as “welfare dependent, complacent, squanderers, lazy and lack a sense of togetherness (disorganized)”. This research identifies some of the dominant group stereotyping that exist among minority-minority relationships as well as perception-based problem areas critical to any individual/collective efforts at coalition building, improving relations and policy implications related to school social development. Moreover, it contributes to an understanding of the historical, political, educational and social construction of racial categorizations and racial attitudes that influence social relations, in positive or negative ways.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

group (70), stereotyp (53), social (42), american (38), indian (37), west (36), minor (35), african (34), relat (28), racial (27), research (25), studi (25), black (24), new (23), ethnic (21), colleg (21), york (20), student (20), focus (18), differ (15), two (15),

Author's Keywords:

Black stereotyping, race relations, African Americans, West Indians/Caribbeans
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Coates, Ramona. "“Hey, Purritty Gurrl! Black Stereotyping: Social Relations among African American and West Indian College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106648_index.html>

APA Citation:

Coates, R. I. , 2003-08-16 "“Hey, Purritty Gurrl! Black Stereotyping: Social Relations among African American and West Indian College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106648_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Stereotyping exists between African-Americans and West Indians in college that may affect student social development based on experiences in and outside the classroom. The conceptualization of voluntary/involuntary minority groupings helps to classify and contextualize the differences between West Indians and African-Americans in college that manifest as racial tensions between the groups. This research explores the extent to which attitudes and stereotypes of intra-racial prejudice influence social interactions between African-American and West Indian college students. Using a mixed method approach, African American and West Indian students from a public university in Metropolitan New York are administered a questionnaire, a racial stereotyping survey, followed by mixed-member focus group interviews. Preliminary findings suggest that stereotypes influence social relationships between West Indians and African-Americans. West Indians have been stereotyped as “jack of all trades and master of none, arrogant, thrifty, pushy and clannish”. African-Americans have been stereotyped as “welfare dependent, complacent, squanderers, lazy and lack a sense of togetherness (disorganized)”. This research identifies some of the dominant group stereotyping that exist among minority-minority relationships as well as perception-based problem areas critical to any individual/collective efforts at coalition building, improving relations and policy implications related to school social development. Moreover, it contributes to an understanding of the historical, political, educational and social construction of racial categorizations and racial attitudes that influence social relations, in positive or negative ways.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 14
Word count: 3441
Text sample:
RAMONA IRENE-ROMAIN COATES Ph.D. Candidate Department of Sociology Wayne State University “Hey Purritty Gurrl! Black Stereotyping: Social Relations among African American and West Indian College Students in Metropolitan New York.” A Work in Progress What did my professor mean? It was my first mid-term exam of my first doctoral level statistics course. I failed it miserably. I approached my professor and asked what I could do to improve my score. He said I had to get a B or
Jonathan and Musick D. (1985). Racial and ethnic antagonism In. American dilemmas: A sociological interpretations of enduring social issues. New York: Columbia University Press. Vickerman Milton (1999). Crosscurrents: West Indian immigrants and race. New York: Oxford University Press. Watkins-Owens Irma (1996). Blood relations: Caribbean immigrants and the harlem community 1900-1930. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Waters Mary C. (1999). Black identities: West Indian immigrant dreams and american realities. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Wood Peter B. and Chesser Michele (1994).


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