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Settlers and Hostiles: Colonial Hate Rhetoric from the Wild West to the West Bank

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Abstract:

Labels such as “settler” for invading groups establishing territorial dominance, and/or “hostile” for indigenous groups resisting the cultural and political invasion, are primary sources for ethnic hatred and racial conflicts. Dominant group interpretations and media uses reinforce “progress” and “civilized” descriptors which justify and rationalize their violent suppression in the name of “law and order” networks they control. The first wide-spread usage of such terms was in the pacification of the “wild west” territories of the United States, against indigenous peoples as “savage” Indians. Contemporary usage exactly resembles past forms, including Israeli and U.S. media descriptors for “settlers” new towns in Palestinian lands, especially the “west bank” area.
These labels are products of ethnocentric racism and cultural domination arising from conquest and colonialism, and are prime purveyors of supremacist ideologies and ethnic hatred. We analyze their historical usage in 19th century western United States and contemporary usage in the Israeli-Palestinian conflicts, finding strong parallels. We observe there are near continuous examples of such terms in the media, extending out from a Euro-American global dominance, and resonating with regional conflicts, as in Israel. We stress that unpacking linguistic terms is central to non-continuance of racial hatred, and remains critical in tough times when new forms such as “terrorist” replace old forms, with potential affect on civil rights and an erosion of hard-won “equal treatment” laws, possibly interfering with peace negotiations and conflict resolution.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

palestinian (120), isra (102), israel (74), state (61), american (55), kill (47), land (46), settler (44), peopl (43), indian (42), west (41), domin (38), new (37), conquest (37), said (35), zionist (34), 2002 (34), group (32), jewish (32), nation (31), claim (29),

Author's Keywords:

Hate Rhetoric, Palestinians, Amer-Indians, Colonialism, Israel & USA
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


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MLA Citation:

Fenelon, James. and Bowles, Matthew. "Settlers and Hostiles: Colonial Hate Rhetoric from the Wild West to the West Bank" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106922_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fenelon, J. V. and Bowles, M. T. , 2003-08-16 "Settlers and Hostiles: Colonial Hate Rhetoric from the Wild West to the West Bank" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p106922_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Labels such as “settler” for invading groups establishing territorial dominance, and/or “hostile” for indigenous groups resisting the cultural and political invasion, are primary sources for ethnic hatred and racial conflicts. Dominant group interpretations and media uses reinforce “progress” and “civilized” descriptors which justify and rationalize their violent suppression in the name of “law and order” networks they control. The first wide-spread usage of such terms was in the pacification of the “wild west” territories of the United States, against indigenous peoples as “savage” Indians. Contemporary usage exactly resembles past forms, including Israeli and U.S. media descriptors for “settlers” new towns in Palestinian lands, especially the “west bank” area.
These labels are products of ethnocentric racism and cultural domination arising from conquest and colonialism, and are prime purveyors of supremacist ideologies and ethnic hatred. We analyze their historical usage in 19th century western United States and contemporary usage in the Israeli-Palestinian conflicts, finding strong parallels. We observe there are near continuous examples of such terms in the media, extending out from a Euro-American global dominance, and resonating with regional conflicts, as in Israel. We stress that unpacking linguistic terms is central to non-continuance of racial hatred, and remains critical in tough times when new forms such as “terrorist” replace old forms, with potential affect on civil rights and an erosion of hard-won “equal treatment” laws, possibly interfering with peace negotiations and conflict resolution.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 25
Word count: 12092
Text sample:
Version: iv January 15 2003 Settlers and Hostiles: Colonial Hate Rhetoric from the Wild West to the West Bank by James V. Fenelon Associate Professor California State University San Bernardino and Matthew T. Bowles Independent Scholar (with SUSTAIN and the American Civil Liberties Union) submitted to the: “The Capacity to Hate: Ethnocentrism and Racism” session for Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorites (organized by John P. Myers Rowan University) at the: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Atlanta Georgia (August
fired from helicopter gunships and tanks. The Israeli Army said the village was a center of terrorist activity. "I never believed they would do this " she said. Her 11-year-old son one of three children woke up and vomited in fear. "They are in shock. He said `Why do they hit us? What did we do?' I never dreamed it would reach this. Everybody looks at what happens to Israel. Nobody looks at what Israel is doing to us."


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