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Leveling the Home Advantage: Educational Equity and Parental Involvement in School

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Abstract:

In the last two decades, a great deal of energy and attention has been dedicated to generating educational equity by increasing the involvement of parents in schools. Previous research suggests that black and Hispanic parents are more involved in their children’s education than white parents are (Kerbow and Bernhardt, 1993; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996). However, the available literature also makes it clear that poor, black and Latino children benefit less from their parent’s efforts at school than white children do (McNeal, 1999; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996, Lareau, 1989).
This paper brings two hypotheses to bear on these findings, using data from the National Household Education Survey. First, I examine the possibility that minority parents tend to be involved in their children’s education in different ways than majority parents, and that this difference affects children’s educational outcomes. Second, I examine the possibility that identical levels of parental involvement have differential effects based on the parent’s race and class. My analyses support both of these hypotheses and help explain the race and class gaps in parental involvement and children’s educational performance.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

school (255), parent (255), involv (214), educ (92), children (75), attend (62), home (57), teacher (47), child (46), level (45), advantag (44), black (42), signific (41), like (41), meet (40), white (36), p (34), activ (33), volunt (33), tabl (32), race (32),

Author's Keywords:

elementary education, parental involvement, grade retention
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Domina, Thurston. "Leveling the Home Advantage: Educational Equity and Parental Involvement in School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p107827_index.html>

APA Citation:

Domina, T. A. , 2003-08-16 "Leveling the Home Advantage: Educational Equity and Parental Involvement in School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p107827_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the last two decades, a great deal of energy and attention has been dedicated to generating educational equity by increasing the involvement of parents in schools. Previous research suggests that black and Hispanic parents are more involved in their children’s education than white parents are (Kerbow and Bernhardt, 1993; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996). However, the available literature also makes it clear that poor, black and Latino children benefit less from their parent’s efforts at school than white children do (McNeal, 1999; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996, Lareau, 1989).
This paper brings two hypotheses to bear on these findings, using data from the National Household Education Survey. First, I examine the possibility that minority parents tend to be involved in their children’s education in different ways than majority parents, and that this difference affects children’s educational outcomes. Second, I examine the possibility that identical levels of parental involvement have differential effects based on the parent’s race and class. My analyses support both of these hypotheses and help explain the race and class gaps in parental involvement and children’s educational performance.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 36
Word count: 8174
Text sample:
Introduction In the last two decades a great deal of research attention and policy-making activity has been dedicated to generating educational equity by increasing the involvement of parents in schools. Parental involvement initiatives have been a mainstay in federal educational policy since the Reagan administration’s 1986 Goals 2000: Educate America Act. In 1996 the Clinton administration reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act adding a new provision that required the nation’s poorest schools to spend at least 1% of
Involvement in Children’s Placement.” Sociology of Education. 65 (1992). 263-279. Waley Sean. “Parents Duties Targeted in Bills.” Las Vegas Review-Journal. March 18 2001. 1B. Wallace Trudy and Herbert J. Walberg. “Parental Partnerships for Learning.” International Journal of Educational Research. 15 (1991): 131-145. Westat Corporation. WesVar 4.0 User’s Guide. Rockville MD: Westat Corp 2000. Zellman Gail Z. Brian Stecher Stephen Klein Daniel McCaffrey. “Findings from an Evaluation of the Parent Institute from Quality Education Parent Involvement Program.” Santa Monica CA:


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