All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

CHIP and Medicaid: The Impact of Difficult Economic Times and State Budgetary Concerns
Unformatted Document Text:  one way, from a sociological perspective, to view the CHIP program during its early implementation was as part of a series of efforts in health policy and health policy development for children that are small, incremental steps in reform (Kronenfeld and Mathieson, 2003). Instead of dealing with a major overhaul of either child health policy or overall health policy, CHIP tries to fix, within the confines of existing health and welfare programs, issues of access to health care for one particular group of children, predominantly the children of the working poor. It initially did so within the context of a health economic situation both at the national level and in most states. One of the criticisms of overall welfare reform has been a concern that pushing the poor into low wage jobs may work in good times, but not bad times. In addition, the state portion of funding for welfare related programs is also potentially vulnerable to a declining economy in a particular state. Incremental Reform Concepts as Related to US Health Care Policy Policy analysts in the US have argued for a number of years that change in US policy in many areas, and especially in areas of social and health policy, are characterized by a process of incremental reform. This argument states that the political process in the US is not one of broad, bold movements, but rather is characterized by policy changes occurring in small steps (increments). This approach argues that rarely in the US does policy become modified in dramatic ways (Lindblom, 1959; Wildavsky, 1964). The incremental model has been developed further by decision theorists. Within sociology, one of its best known applications to health care was developed by Alford (1975), who described three different approaches to reform: market reformers, bureaucratic reformers

Authors: Kronenfeld, Jennie.
first   previous   Page 4 of 21   next   last



background image
one way, from a sociological perspective, to view the CHIP program during its early
implementation was as part of a series of efforts in health policy and health policy development
for children that are small, incremental steps in reform (Kronenfeld and Mathieson, 2003).
Instead of dealing with a major overhaul of either child health policy or overall health policy,
CHIP tries to fix, within the confines of existing health and welfare programs, issues of access to
health care for one particular group of children, predominantly the children of the working poor.
It initially did so within the context of a health economic situation both at the national level and
in most states. One of the criticisms of overall welfare reform has been a concern that pushing
the poor into low wage jobs may work in good times, but not bad times. In addition, the state
portion of funding for welfare related programs is also potentially vulnerable to a declining
economy in a particular state.
Incremental Reform Concepts as Related to US Health Care Policy
Policy analysts in the US have argued for a number of years that change in US policy in
many areas, and especially in areas of social and health policy, are characterized by a process of
incremental reform. This argument states that the political process in the US is not one of broad,
bold movements, but rather is characterized by policy changes occurring in small steps
(increments). This approach argues that rarely in the US does policy become modified in
dramatic ways (Lindblom, 1959; Wildavsky, 1964).
The incremental model has been developed further by decision theorists. Within
sociology, one of its best known applications to health care was developed by Alford (1975),
who described three different approaches to reform: market reformers, bureaucratic reformers


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.