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Technology in the Garden of Good and Evil: or Marcuse, Habermas and Haraway Walk into a Bar

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Abstract:

The current understandings of the global culture industry and specifically the role of technology in the global culture industry have been extensively influenced by the early works of the Frankfurt school. However, this area has not been significantly engaged by feminist theorists or even by the technoscience area of feminist theory. A feminist engagement of the theorizing of technology as it relates to the global culture industry is over due. Marcuse’s paper “Some social implications of modern Technology” (Marcuse, 2002) and Habermas’s paper “Technology and Science as Ideology” (Habermas, 1970) are examined for their theoretical treatements of technology. The perspectives on technology in these ‘classical’ texts are then compared and contrasted with the perspective of leading feminist technoscience theorist Donna Haraway using her paper “A Cyborg manifesto: Science, technology, and socialist-feminism in the late twentieth century” (Haraway, 1991). Her paper is used to provide both critique and to suggest possible ways that a blended theoretical position might move us forward in our understandings of technology and our understandings of technology as it relates to the global culture industry.

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technolog (144), haberma (67), feminist (60), marcus (59), haraway (57), industri (49), scienc (47), cultur (46), ration (40), perspect (38), man (35), machin (34), global (34), knowledg (33), 31 (32), corbin (31), page (31), michell (31), see (30), develop (29), way (27),

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technology, science, feminism, feminist theory, technoscience, Haraway, Marcuse, Habermas, Critical Theory
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Corbin, Michelle. "Technology in the Garden of Good and Evil: or Marcuse, Habermas and Haraway Walk into a Bar" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p108679_index.html>

APA Citation:

Corbin, M. D. , 2004-08-14 "Technology in the Garden of Good and Evil: or Marcuse, Habermas and Haraway Walk into a Bar" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA, Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p108679_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current understandings of the global culture industry and specifically the role of technology in the global culture industry have been extensively influenced by the early works of the Frankfurt school. However, this area has not been significantly engaged by feminist theorists or even by the technoscience area of feminist theory. A feminist engagement of the theorizing of technology as it relates to the global culture industry is over due. Marcuse’s paper “Some social implications of modern Technology” (Marcuse, 2002) and Habermas’s paper “Technology and Science as Ideology” (Habermas, 1970) are examined for their theoretical treatements of technology. The perspectives on technology in these ‘classical’ texts are then compared and contrasted with the perspective of leading feminist technoscience theorist Donna Haraway using her paper “A Cyborg manifesto: Science, technology, and socialist-feminism in the late twentieth century” (Haraway, 1991). Her paper is used to provide both critique and to suggest possible ways that a blended theoretical position might move us forward in our understandings of technology and our understandings of technology as it relates to the global culture industry.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 31
Word count: 8308
Text sample:
Technology in the Garden of good and evil: or Marcuse Habermas and Haraway Walk into a Bar Michelle Corbin University of Maryland College Park Michelle Corbin Page 2 of 31 Abstract The current understandings of the global culture industry and specifically the role of technology in the global culture industry have been extensively influenced by the early works of the Frankfurt school. However this area has not been significantly engaged by feminist theorists or even by the technoscience area
(1999). Revising Diffracting Acting. In A.E. Clarke and V.L. Olesen (Eds.) Revisioning Women Health and Healing. New York: Routledge. Hill-Collins Patricia. (1998). Fighting Words: Black women and the search for justice. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Butler Judith. (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge. Downey Gary Lee & Rogers Juan D. (1995). On the politics of theorizing in a postmodern academy. American Anthropologist 97(2) 269-281. Sassower Raphael. (1994). The politics of situating knowledge:


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