All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Can Sociology Help To Prevent Future Columbines?
Unformatted Document Text:  4 When we began tabulating results, the most strikingly consistent finding was a dislike of school’s academic programs at every level of schooling, among the overwhelming majority of respondents. A very small minority reported liking school in all its aspects. Most respondents reported that school was boring and tedious; there were frequent reports of resentment at “teachers’ pets” and favoritism; and substantial numbers of respondents mentioned bullying, and being bullied, in school. What the respondents liked was being with their friends and having enjoyable social time. This was true for every level of schooling. While these interviews were in no way ‘scientific’ by our disciplinary standards, they were “stories from the field,” consistent and repetitive stories of school days that were in no way idyllic or romantic. Many of my students were not surprised at the findings specifically; we were all, however, surprised at the sheer numbers of those reporting disaffection with school as a place and setting in which they spent a substantial amount of their young lives. Even if they had done well in school, and whatever the races and ethnicities of the respondents from this highly diverse university and region, there was a sense of disengagement from school, a “they and we” sense of having lived under authoritarian rule that was hostile to the young. This aspect of disengagement has been overlooked, and was overlooked in the Columbine case. When the Columbine shootings were reported, and the subsequent analyses began to be done, what emerged was a pattern of alienation, of marginalization of the killers, of two boys whose experience in school and among their peers led them to formulate a plan of revenge. In effect, the school experience, together with other circumstances of their lives, had led to “violentization,” Athens’ (1997) term melding “violent ” and “socialization”. While Athens’ describes a four-step process that creates violent criminals, we need to look at what elements are there in the schools that so brutalize students as to create killers. If we treat the process leading to violent criminal behavior as the ‘ideal type’ process, we can become more aware of elements of the process, and its progression, that could lead to violent outcomes among students. (See Appendix I based on http://www.privatefamilymatter.com/Vocabulary/violentization.htm ). We are perhaps looking for single reasons, in the wrong places, for the lack of academic enthusiasm among the young. An examination of the hostile social environment is warranted to better explain it.

Authors: Donati, Teresa.
first   previous   Page 4 of 18   next   last



background image
4
When we began tabulating results, the most strikingly consistent finding was a dislike of
school’s academic programs at every level of schooling, among the overwhelming
majority of respondents. A very small minority reported liking school in all its aspects.
Most respondents reported that school was boring and tedious; there were frequent
reports of resentment at “teachers’ pets” and favoritism; and substantial numbers of
respondents mentioned bullying, and being bullied, in school.

What the respondents liked was being with their friends and having enjoyable social time.
This was true for every level of schooling.

While these interviews were in no way ‘scientific’ by our disciplinary standards, they
were “stories from the field,” consistent and repetitive stories of school days that were in
no way idyllic or romantic. Many of my students were not surprised at the findings
specifically; we were all, however, surprised at the sheer numbers of those reporting
disaffection with school as a place and setting in which they spent a substantial amount of
their young lives.

Even if they had done well in school, and whatever the races and ethnicities of the
respondents from this highly diverse university and region, there was a sense of
disengagement from school, a “they and we” sense of having lived under authoritarian
rule that was hostile to the young.

This aspect of disengagement has been overlooked, and was overlooked in the
Columbine case. When the Columbine shootings were reported, and the subsequent
analyses began to be done, what emerged was a pattern of alienation, of marginalization
of the killers, of two boys whose experience in school and among their peers led them to
formulate a plan of revenge. In effect, the school experience, together with other
circumstances of their lives, had led to “violentization,” Athens’ (1997) term melding
“violent ” and “socialization”.

While Athens’ describes a four-step process that creates violent criminals, we need to
look at what elements are there in the schools that so brutalize students as to create
killers. If we treat the process leading to violent criminal behavior as the ‘ideal type’
process, we can become more aware of elements of the process, and its progression, that
could lead to violent outcomes among students. (See Appendix I based on
http://www.privatefamilymatter.com/Vocabulary/violentization.htm
).
We are perhaps looking for single reasons, in the wrong places, for the lack of academic
enthusiasm among the young. An examination of the hostile social environment is
warranted to better explain it.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 18   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.