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“My heart is always there”: First- and Second-Generation Mexican Immigrant Women's Transnational Practices and their Health Implications

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Abstract:

This paper speaks to the intriguing and the well-documented phenomenon in which the health of Mexican immigrants deteriorates with subsequent generations in the U.S., despite improvements in their socio-economic status. It examines the role that embeddedness in transnational networks might play in providing health-promoting resources to immigrant women and their descendants. In particular, it discusses preliminary findings on the transnational experiences of first- and second-generation Mexican women, based on qualitative in-depth interviews with residents of a predominantly Mexican neighborhood in a large midwestern city. In that regard, this paper (1) describes the types of transnational social interactions women engage in and the meaning these interactions have for them; (2) examines how transnational social interactions shape the construction of ethnic identities and provide cultural and social resources to immigrants and their descendants; and (3) discusses the ways these processes may affect the health of immigrants. In doing so, it contributes to the literatures on immigration and health as well as those on transnationalism and gender.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

transnat (71), women (68), health (67), mexico (56), generat (53), social (53), like (40), immigr (39), famili (36), first (33), feel (31), support (30), know (29), mexican (27), peopl (25), network (25), go (25), m (25), first-gener (24), second (24), u.s (23),

Author's Keywords:

Transnationalism, Latino/a, Migration, Health
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Viruell-Fuentes, Edna. "“My heart is always there”: First- and Second-Generation Mexican Immigrant Women's Transnational Practices and their Health Implications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p109812_index.html>

APA Citation:

Viruell-Fuentes, E. A. , 2004-08-14 "“My heart is always there”: First- and Second-Generation Mexican Immigrant Women's Transnational Practices and their Health Implications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA, Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p109812_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper speaks to the intriguing and the well-documented phenomenon in which the health of Mexican immigrants deteriorates with subsequent generations in the U.S., despite improvements in their socio-economic status. It examines the role that embeddedness in transnational networks might play in providing health-promoting resources to immigrant women and their descendants. In particular, it discusses preliminary findings on the transnational experiences of first- and second-generation Mexican women, based on qualitative in-depth interviews with residents of a predominantly Mexican neighborhood in a large midwestern city. In that regard, this paper (1) describes the types of transnational social interactions women engage in and the meaning these interactions have for them; (2) examines how transnational social interactions shape the construction of ethnic identities and provide cultural and social resources to immigrants and their descendants; and (3) discusses the ways these processes may affect the health of immigrants. In doing so, it contributes to the literatures on immigration and health as well as those on transnationalism and gender.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 20
Word count: 7525
Text sample:
“My heart is always there”: First- and Second-Generation Mexican Immigrant Women's Transnational Practices and their Health Implications1 Paper Submitted for Consideration to The 99th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association San Francisco California Edna A. Viruell-Fuentes Doctoral Candidate University of Michigan ednav@umich.edu PLEASE DO NOT DUPLICATE CIRCULATE OR CITE WITHOUT AUTHOR’S PERMISSION Introduction For almost two decades U.S. public health researchers have been baffled by findings revealing that first-generation Mexican immigrants experience better physical and mental health outcomes—despite
Childbearing characteristics of U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers. Public Health Reports 100(6) 647-652. Williams D. R. & Collins C. (1995). US socioeconomic and racial differences in health: Patterns and explanations. Annual Review of Sociology 21 349-386. Williams D. R. & House J. S. (1991). Stress social support control and coping: A social epidemiological view. In B. Badura & I. Kickbusch (Eds.) Health promotion research: Towards a new social epidemiology (pp. 147-172). Copenhagen Denmark: World Health Organization. Winkleby M. Fortmann


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The Social Contexts of Mexican Immigrant Social Networks: A Generational Analysis with Implications for Research on Immigrant Health


 
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