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Dynamics of Change in the Alternative Health and Human Services Sector: Examining Resource Partitioning and Viability in the Self-Help/Mutual-Aid Organizational Population, 1955-2000.

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Abstract:

Abstract:
During the 1960s and 1970s, decreasing medical-professional hegemony, increasing rationalization within the health care system, and privatization in health and human services contributed to the unprecedented growth of nonprofit community-based health and human service organizations. One of these subsectors, self-help/mutual-aid, attained unprecedented attention because of its capture of a large share of alternative health care industry resources. These consist primarily of constituents interested in forming and maintaining groups addressing personal stigmatizing conditions or problems ranging from medical disability to behavioral dysfunction, in a public but intimate face-to-face group setting. Although a considerable amount of research on modern self-help/mutual-aid has been undertaken during the last several decades, few studies have examined its inter-organizational dynamics. To fill the gap, this paper describes the central patterns of organizational growth, decline and persistence in the self-help/mutual-aid population. In order to understand the dynamics of the population, I examine founding and disbanding rates, and diversification over the forty-five year history of self-help/mutual-aid. In addition, this paper extends resource partitioning theory by apply its central insights to inter-population organizational processes rather than intra-population ones. It is concluded that the self-help/mutual-aid subsector experienced the same type of growth, decline and market partitioning that commercial and bureaucratic populations experience.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

organ (145), self (143), help (126), self-help (119), /mutual-aid (93), organiz (92), popul (79), year (52), group (49), resourc (47), found (47), rate (46), disband (36), addict (33), subpopul (30), alcohol (29), market (27), e.g (27), growth (27), partit (27), 2000 (27),

Author's Keywords:

self-help/mutual-aid, organizations, healthcare delivery
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Archibald, Matthew. "Dynamics of Change in the Alternative Health and Human Services Sector: Examining Resource Partitioning and Viability in the Self-Help/Mutual-Aid Organizational Population, 1955-2000." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p110020_index.html>

APA Citation:

Archibald, M. E. , 2004-08-14 "Dynamics of Change in the Alternative Health and Human Services Sector: Examining Resource Partitioning and Viability in the Self-Help/Mutual-Aid Organizational Population, 1955-2000." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA, Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p110020_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract:
During the 1960s and 1970s, decreasing medical-professional hegemony, increasing rationalization within the health care system, and privatization in health and human services contributed to the unprecedented growth of nonprofit community-based health and human service organizations. One of these subsectors, self-help/mutual-aid, attained unprecedented attention because of its capture of a large share of alternative health care industry resources. These consist primarily of constituents interested in forming and maintaining groups addressing personal stigmatizing conditions or problems ranging from medical disability to behavioral dysfunction, in a public but intimate face-to-face group setting. Although a considerable amount of research on modern self-help/mutual-aid has been undertaken during the last several decades, few studies have examined its inter-organizational dynamics. To fill the gap, this paper describes the central patterns of organizational growth, decline and persistence in the self-help/mutual-aid population. In order to understand the dynamics of the population, I examine founding and disbanding rates, and diversification over the forty-five year history of self-help/mutual-aid. In addition, this paper extends resource partitioning theory by apply its central insights to inter-population organizational processes rather than intra-population ones. It is concluded that the self-help/mutual-aid subsector experienced the same type of growth, decline and market partitioning that commercial and bureaucratic populations experience.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 27
Word count: 8071
Text sample:
Dynamics of Change in the Alternative Health and Human Services Sector: Examining Resource Partitioning and Viability in the Self-Help/Mutual-Aid Organizational Population 1955-2000. Matthew E. Archibald Department of Sociology Emory University Atlanta Georgia ASA Submission January 2004 _______________ Draft . Please do not quote or cite without author’s permission. I would like to thank Debra Minkoff and Pete Guest for their comments on earlier versions of this project. Data collection for this paper was supported in part by an NSF
10.07 na 1067 0.000 0.005 Skin Burns Reconstructive Surgery 11.31 na 5305 0.000 0.014 Respiratory Circulatory Pulmonary 12.38 3000 7113 0.003 0.006 Number of organizations 589 Number of members 1022003 4950103 a Size based on a reduced number of cases excluding those with missing membership figures b Category covers a range of relationship issues including marriage family behavioral support groups such as Al- Anon and Gam-Anon 27


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