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Robots as New Media: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social and Cognitive Responses to Robotic and On-Screen Agents

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Abstract:

Social responses to lifelike characters can significantly alter human evaluations of technology. This study tested the differences between a picture of an on-screen character interacting in three different contexts (retail purchase, health advice, reading survey) versus a three-dimensional robot conducting the same interactions off screen. A laboratory experiment (n=72) was conducted in the US and replicated in Japan which tested differences in social evaluations, credibility, and memory. Results showed significant interactions between nationality and embodiment across a range of social and cognitive responses including perceived credibility, perceived surveillance, memory, and valence. These results are interpreted within technological and cultural contexts.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

robot (55), particip (52), differ (43), agent (36), interact (35), screen (32), media (31), comput (27), cultur (26), japanes (26), respons (24), embodi (24), credibl (24), communic (22), m (22), on-screen (20), social (20), charact (19), research (19), use (18), structur (17),

Author's Keywords:

interactive media, robots, human-computer interaction
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Name: International Communication Association
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MLA Citation:

Shinozawa, Kazuhiko., Reeves, Byron., Wise, Kevin., Lim, Sohye., Maldonado, Heidy. and Naya, Futoshi. "Robots as New Media: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social and Cognitive Responses to Robotic and On-Screen Agents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111355_index.html>

APA Citation:

Shinozawa, K. , Reeves, B. , Wise, K. , Lim, S. , Maldonado, H. and Naya, F. , 2003-05-27 "Robots as New Media: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social and Cognitive Responses to Robotic and On-Screen Agents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111355_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social responses to lifelike characters can significantly alter human evaluations of technology. This study tested the differences between a picture of an on-screen character interacting in three different contexts (retail purchase, health advice, reading survey) versus a three-dimensional robot conducting the same interactions off screen. A laboratory experiment (n=72) was conducted in the US and replicated in Japan which tested differences in social evaluations, credibility, and memory. Results showed significant interactions between nationality and embodiment across a range of social and cognitive responses including perceived credibility, perceived surveillance, memory, and valence. These results are interpreted within technological and cultural contexts.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 15
Word count: 4734
Text sample:
Robots as New Media: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Social and Cognitive Responses to Robotic and On-Screen Agents Paper submitted to the Information Systems Division of the International Communication Association November 1 2002 ABSTRACT Social responses to lifelike characters can significantly alter human evaluations of technology. This study tested the differences between a picture of an on-screen character interacting in three different contexts (retail purchase health advice reading survey) versus a three-dimensional robot conducting the same interactions off screen. A
McDonald D. Hirsch J. & Goldstein R. (1985). Attention to television. Intra-stimulus effects of movement and scene changes on alpha variation over time. International Journal of Neuroscience 25 241-255. Steuer J. (1992). Defining virtual reality: Dimensions determining telepresence. Journal of Communication 42 73-93. Thorson E. & Lang A. (1992). Effects of television video graphics and lecture familiarity on adult cardiac orienting responses and memory. Communication Research 19 346-369. Trandis H.C. (1990). Cross-cultural studies of individualism and collectivism In Dienstbier


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