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Rival Visions: Reportorial Approaches, Audience Preferences, and New Frontiers
Unformatted Document Text:  Rival Visions: Reportorial Approaches, Audience Preferences, and New Frontiers 17 journal ignored non-American texts in classifying Worcester’s work as the “most comprehensive” book on the subject. Nation Volume 67, December 1, 1898, pp. 415-416. Great Britain’s John Foreman, The Philippine Islands: A Political, Geographical, Ethnographical, Social and Commercial History (London: S. Low, Marston & Co., Ltd., 1899) probably deserved that distinction at the time, though Foreman’s work was blighted by inaccuracies, while Worcester’s was more characterized by distortion than factual errors. 17 "What Shall Be Done with the Philippines?" Literary Digest, Vol. 17 (1898), p. 241. For more reviews of the book, see Sullivan, pp. 34-35. 18 Oscar King Davis, Our Conquests in the Pacific (New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1899). 19 See my conference paper, “Cartoon Colonialism: Race, Gender, and Culture in the Iconography of American Empire.” 20 Sears, Roebuck and Co. Consumer’s Guide, Fall 1900 (Northfield, Ill.: DBI Books, 1971), p. 218. 21 Draft of Article, "The Head Hunters of Northern Luzon, " p.21, Dean Worcester Collection, Harlan Hatcher Special Collections Library, University of Michigan. 22 For example, former colonial administrator Austin Craig related an instance in which Worcester attempted to have the province of Mindoro, where Catholics predominated, classified as non-Christian by asserting that 100,000 Mangyan tribespeople lived in a hidden valley. Debunked, he wrangled to remove control of the island from his rivals, but failed. Josephine and Austin Craig, Farthest Westing (Dorrance and Co., 1940), p.28. 23 ”Benguet -- The Garden of the Philippines,” National Geographic, Vol. 14 (May 1903), pp. 203-210. In a photograph on p. 209, a tiny Negrito woman is posed next to Worcester, presumably for contrast. The pairing would become a favorite image for American newspapers reporting on Worcester for the next decade. 24 See Worcester, “Notes on Some Primitive Philippine Tribes,” National Geographic, Vol. 9, (June 1898) pp. 284-301; “Field Sports Among the Wild Men of Northern Luzon,” National Geographic, Vol. 22 (March 1911), pp. 215-267; “The Non-Christian Peoples of the Philippine Islands,” National Geographic, Vol. 24 (November 1913), pp. 1157-1256. 25 In 1915, Quezon reported that his extensive tour of the United States revealed “misapprehensions … as to the real conditions in the Philippine Islands; due, probably as much as anything else, to the exhibition of the native Igorote village at the St. Louis Exposition ten years ago.” Quote from “Philippine Day at the Panama Exposition,” The Filipino People 3 (December 1915), accessed February 11, 2002 via http://www.boondocksnet.com/expos/wfe_fp_151200.html 26 Overland Times, Ceylon, December 3, 1902, p. 1, in JB Box 134. 27 Report of the Philippine Exposition Board, (Microfilm Reel 159, No. 3, National Museum of American History, Washington, DC), pp. 26-30. Igorots accounted for more than $200,000 of the $407,028.37 earned by of Philippine Exhibition. “Igorrotes Were Best Attraction,” St. Louis Republic, December 9, 1904.

Authors: Vaughan, Christopher.
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Rival Visions: Reportorial Approaches, Audience Preferences, and New Frontiers
17
journal ignored non-American texts in classifying Worcester’s work as the “most
comprehensive” book on the subject. Nation Volume 67, December 1, 1898, pp. 415-416.
Great Britain’s John Foreman, The Philippine Islands: A Political, Geographical,
Ethnographical, Social and Commercial History
(London: S. Low, Marston & Co., Ltd.,
1899) probably deserved that distinction at the time, though Foreman’s work was
blighted by inaccuracies, while Worcester’s was more characterized by distortion than
factual errors.
17
"What Shall Be Done with the Philippines?" Literary Digest, Vol. 17 (1898), p.
241. For more reviews of the book, see Sullivan, pp. 34-35.
18
Oscar King Davis, Our Conquests in the Pacific (New York: Frederick A.
Stokes Company, 1899).
19
See my conference paper, “Cartoon Colonialism: Race, Gender, and Culture in
the Iconography of American Empire.”
20
Sears, Roebuck and Co. Consumer’s Guide, Fall 1900 (Northfield, Ill.: DBI
Books, 1971), p. 218.
21
Draft of Article, "The Head Hunters of Northern Luzon, " p.21, Dean Worcester
Collection, Harlan Hatcher Special Collections Library, University of Michigan.
22
For example, former colonial administrator Austin Craig related an instance in
which Worcester attempted to have the province of Mindoro, where Catholics
predominated, classified as non-Christian by asserting that 100,000 Mangyan
tribespeople lived in a hidden valley. Debunked, he wrangled to remove control of the
island from his rivals, but failed. Josephine and Austin Craig, Farthest Westing (Dorrance
and Co., 1940), p.28.
23
”Benguet -- The Garden of the Philippines,” National Geographic, Vol. 14
(May 1903), pp. 203-210. In a photograph on p. 209, a tiny Negrito woman is posed next
to Worcester, presumably for contrast. The pairing would become a favorite image for
American newspapers reporting on Worcester for the next decade.
24
See Worcester, “Notes on Some Primitive Philippine Tribes,” National
Geographic, Vol. 9, (June 1898) pp. 284-301; “Field Sports Among the Wild Men of
Northern Luzon,” National Geographic, Vol. 22 (March 1911), pp. 215-267; “The Non-
Christian Peoples of the Philippine Islands,” National Geographic, Vol. 24 (November
1913), pp. 1157-1256.
25
In 1915, Quezon reported that his extensive tour of the United States revealed
“misapprehensions … as to the real conditions in the Philippine Islands; due, probably as
much as anything else, to the exhibition of the native Igorote village at the St. Louis
Exposition ten years ago.” Quote from “Philippine Day at the Panama Exposition,” The
Filipino People 3 (December 1915), accessed February 11, 2002 via
http://www.boondocksnet.com/expos/wfe_fp_151200.html
26
Overland Times, Ceylon, December 3, 1902, p. 1, in JB Box 134.
27
Report of the Philippine Exposition Board, (Microfilm Reel 159, No. 3,
National Museum of American History, Washington, DC), pp. 26-30. Igorots accounted
for more than $200,000 of the $407,028.37 earned by of Philippine Exhibition. “Igorrotes
Were Best Attraction,” St. Louis Republic, December 9, 1904.


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