Citation

An Empirical Analysis In To The Antecedents Of PDA Adoption: Comparing The Effects Of Innovation Factors On Attitudes And Behavioral Intent

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles



Abstract:

An Empirical Analysis In To The Antecedents Of PDA Adoption: Comparing The Effects Of Innovation Factors On Attitudes And Behavioral Intent

Extended Abstract

As new technologies inundate the market the understanding of key variable factors that can predict their diffusion has become paramount. The diffusion of innovations paradigm (Rogers, 1983, 1995; Rogers and Singhal, 1996) provides demand side explanations of how new innovations are communicated, evaluated, adopted, and reevaluated by consumers (Williams, Strover, and Grant, 1994). According to the theory, adoption decisions are subject to four major factors namely, adoptersí personality traits, socioeconomic influences, interpersonal and mass media influences, and the perceived attributes of the innovation. These perceived attributes are key determinants of adoption decisions and thereby the rate of diffusion. The current study focuses on a relatively new innovation Ė the PDA or the Personal Digital Assistant, and explores key attributes that predict behavioral intention by potential adopters by applying a research model based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989).
TAM is an adaptation of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) (Fishbein and Ajzen, 1975) and is tailored for modeling user acceptance of information technology. TAM is a robust model that provides explanation of user behavior across a broad range of end user computing technologies and user populations (Davis et al., 1989). According to TRA, a personís performance of a specified behavior is determined by his behavioral intention (BI), and BI is jointly determined by the personís attitude (A) and subjective norms (SN) concerning the behavior in question. Similar to TRA, TAM postulates that usage is determined by BI, but differs in that BI is viewed as being jointly determined by a personís attitude toward the system (A) and perceived usefulness. According to TAM, attitude toward a system is jointly determined by usefulness and ease of use.
The research model for this study is based on the TAM model while introducing several modifications, which are not in TAM. According to Davis (1989) complexity or the degree to which diffusion is perceived as being relatively difficult to use parallels perceived ease of use. However, other factors from diffusion theory such as compatibility and relative advantage have been dealt with too broadly and inconsistently as to be difficult of interpret (Tornatzky and Klein, 1982; Davis, 1989). Hence, based on the diffusion of innovations theory, three new constructs were introduced in place of perceived usefulness, namely perceived convenience, perceived costs/risks of adoption, and perceived observable benefits. The belief variables are the four user perceptions of PDAís: relative ease of use, perceived convenience, costs/risks, and observable benefits. These belief variables affect attitude towards technology in general, and these attitudes in turn affect behavioral intent (BI). BI is then considered a key determinant of actual usage. Based on this adaptation of TAM, key hypothesis are generated to predict the potential relationships between these determinants of PDA adoption. Since the study focuses only on these key factors, the external stimulus variables such as demographics, ownership of technology, and media use are controlled for.
Data for the study has been collected using a CATI system with a representative sample of potential PDA consumers. The data was collected over 2 weeks of September 2002. Preliminary analysis of the data suggests that controlling for other factors, the attitude towards technology is determined by the perceived ease of use, and the potential costs or risks involved in adopting the innovation. BI is significantly predicted by attitude (A). The findings of the study would further the understanding of innovation decisions by helping marketers focus on key variables when promoting a new technology product.







References

Davis, F.D. (1989). Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and user acceptance of information technology. MIS Quarterly, 13 (3), 319-340.

Davis, F.D., Bagozzi, R.P., and Warshaw, P.R. (1989). User acceptance of computing technology: A comparison of two theoretical models. Management Science, 35, 982-1003.

Fishbein, M., and Ajzen, I. (1975). Belief, attitude, intention and behavior: An introduction to theory and research, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Rogers, E.M. (1983). Diffusion of innovations, 3rd Edn. New York: Free Press.

Rogers, E.M., and Singhal, A. (1996). Diffusion of innovations. In M. Salwen & D. Stacks (Eds.), An integrated approach to communication theory and research, Mahwah, NJ: LEA, Inc.

Willams, F., Strover, S., and Grant, A.U. (1994). Social aspects of new media technologies. In J. Bryant & D. Zillman (Eds.), Media effects advances in theory and research, Hillsdale, NJ: LEA, Inc.

Author's Keywords:

TAM, PDAs, perceived ease of use, behavioral intent
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111368_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Vishwanath, Arun. "An Empirical Analysis In To The Antecedents Of PDA Adoption: Comparing The Effects Of Innovation Factors On Attitudes And Behavioral Intent" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111368_index.html>

APA Citation:

Vishwanath, A. , 2003-05-27 "An Empirical Analysis In To The Antecedents Of PDA Adoption: Comparing The Effects Of Innovation Factors On Attitudes And Behavioral Intent" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111368_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An Empirical Analysis In To The Antecedents Of PDA Adoption: Comparing The Effects Of Innovation Factors On Attitudes And Behavioral Intent

Extended Abstract

As new technologies inundate the market the understanding of key variable factors that can predict their diffusion has become paramount. The diffusion of innovations paradigm (Rogers, 1983, 1995; Rogers and Singhal, 1996) provides demand side explanations of how new innovations are communicated, evaluated, adopted, and reevaluated by consumers (Williams, Strover, and Grant, 1994). According to the theory, adoption decisions are subject to four major factors namely, adoptersí personality traits, socioeconomic influences, interpersonal and mass media influences, and the perceived attributes of the innovation. These perceived attributes are key determinants of adoption decisions and thereby the rate of diffusion. The current study focuses on a relatively new innovation Ė the PDA or the Personal Digital Assistant, and explores key attributes that predict behavioral intention by potential adopters by applying a research model based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989).
TAM is an adaptation of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) (Fishbein and Ajzen, 1975) and is tailored for modeling user acceptance of information technology. TAM is a robust model that provides explanation of user behavior across a broad range of end user computing technologies and user populations (Davis et al., 1989). According to TRA, a personís performance of a specified behavior is determined by his behavioral intention (BI), and BI is jointly determined by the personís attitude (A) and subjective norms (SN) concerning the behavior in question. Similar to TRA, TAM postulates that usage is determined by BI, but differs in that BI is viewed as being jointly determined by a personís attitude toward the system (A) and perceived usefulness. According to TAM, attitude toward a system is jointly determined by usefulness and ease of use.
The research model for this study is based on the TAM model while introducing several modifications, which are not in TAM. According to Davis (1989) complexity or the degree to which diffusion is perceived as being relatively difficult to use parallels perceived ease of use. However, other factors from diffusion theory such as compatibility and relative advantage have been dealt with too broadly and inconsistently as to be difficult of interpret (Tornatzky and Klein, 1982; Davis, 1989). Hence, based on the diffusion of innovations theory, three new constructs were introduced in place of perceived usefulness, namely perceived convenience, perceived costs/risks of adoption, and perceived observable benefits. The belief variables are the four user perceptions of PDAís: relative ease of use, perceived convenience, costs/risks, and observable benefits. These belief variables affect attitude towards technology in general, and these attitudes in turn affect behavioral intent (BI). BI is then considered a key determinant of actual usage. Based on this adaptation of TAM, key hypothesis are generated to predict the potential relationships between these determinants of PDA adoption. Since the study focuses only on these key factors, the external stimulus variables such as demographics, ownership of technology, and media use are controlled for.
Data for the study has been collected using a CATI system with a representative sample of potential PDA consumers. The data was collected over 2 weeks of September 2002. Preliminary analysis of the data suggests that controlling for other factors, the attitude towards technology is determined by the perceived ease of use, and the potential costs or risks involved in adopting the innovation. BI is significantly predicted by attitude (A). The findings of the study would further the understanding of innovation decisions by helping marketers focus on key variables when promoting a new technology product.







References

Davis, F.D. (1989). Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and user acceptance of information technology. MIS Quarterly, 13 (3), 319-340.

Davis, F.D., Bagozzi, R.P., and Warshaw, P.R. (1989). User acceptance of computing technology: A comparison of two theoretical models. Management Science, 35, 982-1003.

Fishbein, M., and Ajzen, I. (1975). Belief, attitude, intention and behavior: An introduction to theory and research, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Rogers, E.M. (1983). Diffusion of innovations, 3rd Edn. New York: Free Press.

Rogers, E.M., and Singhal, A. (1996). Diffusion of innovations. In M. Salwen & D. Stacks (Eds.), An integrated approach to communication theory and research, Mahwah, NJ: LEA, Inc.

Willams, F., Strover, S., and Grant, A.U. (1994). Social aspects of new media technologies. In J. Bryant & D. Zillman (Eds.), Media effects advances in theory and research, Hillsdale, NJ: LEA, Inc.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.


Similar Titles:
A Meta-Analysis Examining the Relationship Between Self and Response Efficacy of Condom Use and the Attitudes, Behavioral Intentions, and Condom-Use Behaviors

A Comparative Analysis of the Effectiveness of International Organizations on the Establishment and Acceptance of International Social Norms of Behavior

A Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Coalition Cabinet Characteristics on Event Behavior

Analysis of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Demographic Bias and Effect of Weighting on Risk Factor Estimates


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.