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Gender Patterns and Smoking Susceptibility among Adolescents Who View Actors Smoking
Unformatted Document Text:  Actors and smoking susceptibility, p. 18 reported regularly seeing actors smoke on televison and in the movies were 2.05 (p < .01) times more likely to be susceptible to smoking. The second hypothesis proposed that, after controlling for the demographic and risk predictors, the relationship between regular exposure to actors smoking and adolescent susceptibility to smoking would be greater among females, versus males. Table 2 similarly summarizes the results for the female and male sub-samples. The models for both subsamples are statistically significant [X 2 (10, N = 2,507) = 64.17, p < .001; and X 2 (10, N = 2,507) = 31.28, p < .001], respectively]. For the individual models, the results for the female sub-sample generally mirrored the overall sample findings. Most notably, after controlling for the other predictor variables, female adolescents who regularly saw TV and movie actors smoke were 2.73 (p < .01) times more likely to be susceptible to smoking. The results for the male sub-sample were more distinct. When controlling for the other predictor variables, there was not an appreciable relationship between males’ exposure to television and movie actors who smoke and their own susceptibility to smoking. The statistical literature does not indicate a procedure that allows a direct test between the female and male multiple logistic regression models. The comparative chi- square values, odds-ratios and patterns of statistical significance indicated that the model for females was a better predictor of smoking susceptibility. Furthermore, the relationship between regularly seeing TV and movie stars smoke and adolescents’ susceptibility to smoking was statistically significant only among females. It should be noted, however, that there was an overlap in the 95% confidence intervals for the female and male odds ratios.

Authors: Arpan, Laura., Heald, Gary. and Visser, Muriel.
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Actors and smoking susceptibility, p. 18
reported regularly seeing actors smoke on televison and in the movies were 2.05 (p < .01)
times more likely to be susceptible to smoking.
The second hypothesis proposed that, after controlling for the demographic and
risk predictors, the relationship between regular exposure to actors smoking and
adolescent susceptibility to smoking would be greater among females, versus males.
Table 2 similarly summarizes the results for the female and male sub-samples. The
models for both subsamples are statistically significant [X
2
(10, N = 2,507) = 64.17, p <
.001; and X
2
(10, N = 2,507) = 31.28, p < .001], respectively].
For the individual models, the results for the female sub-sample generally
mirrored the overall sample findings. Most notably, after controlling for the other
predictor variables, female adolescents who regularly saw TV and movie actors smoke
were 2.73 (p < .01) times more likely to be susceptible to smoking. The results for the
male sub-sample were more distinct. When controlling for the other predictor variables,
there was not an appreciable relationship between males’ exposure to television and
movie actors who smoke and their own susceptibility to smoking.
The statistical literature does not indicate a procedure that allows a direct test
between the female and male multiple logistic regression models. The comparative chi-
square values, odds-ratios and patterns of statistical significance indicated that the model
for females was a better predictor of smoking susceptibility. Furthermore, the
relationship between regularly seeing TV and movie stars smoke and adolescents’
susceptibility to smoking was statistically significant only among females. It should be
noted, however, that there was an overlap in the 95% confidence intervals for the female
and male odds ratios.


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