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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of three subjective cultural factors-- self-construals (independence and interdependence), ethnic identity (bicultural, assimilation, traditional, and marginal), and cultural health beliefs (equity and behavioral-environmental attributions)--on source, message, and channel preferences for receiving breast health information. Hispanic women aged 35 or older (N = 132) completed a self-report questionnaire. An instrument to measure communication preference was created that included seven variables: expert sources, family sources, fear messages, encouraging messages, media channels, face-to-face channels, and no information. There were three main findings of the study. First, subjective cultural variables were significant predictors of communication preferences ranging from 61 361003410535f the variance explained. Second, interdependence was a positive predictor of six communication variables (all but no information), while bicultural identity was a predictor of four (expert sources, encouraging messages, media channels, and no information [-]). Third, four clusters of associations were discovered: (a) interdependence and traditional identity were associated positively with media and face-to-face channels, (b) interdependence and assimilation were associated positively with family sources and fear messages, (c) marginal identity and equity attributions were associated positively with fear messages and a desire for no information, and (d) bicultural identity and behavioral-environmental attributions were associated positively with encouraging messages and media channels.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

breast (127), prefer (114), communic (100), cancer (94), cultur (92), inform (92), health (87), channel (83), messag (82), women (70), sourc (69), hispan (67), face (56), variabl (46), al (46), et (46), interdepend (40), subject (40), factor (39), item (38), media (34),

Author's Keywords:

communication preferences, subjective culture, Hispanic women, breast cancer
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MLA Citation:

DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John. "Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111375_index.html>

APA Citation:

DeVargas, F. , Sanchez, C. E. and Oetzel, J. , 2003-05-27 "Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111375_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of three subjective cultural factors-- self-construals (independence and interdependence), ethnic identity (bicultural, assimilation, traditional, and marginal), and cultural health beliefs (equity and behavioral-environmental attributions)--on source, message, and channel preferences for receiving breast health information. Hispanic women aged 35 or older (N = 132) completed a self-report questionnaire. An instrument to measure communication preference was created that included seven variables: expert sources, family sources, fear messages, encouraging messages, media channels, face-to-face channels, and no information. There were three main findings of the study. First, subjective cultural variables were significant predictors of communication preferences ranging from 61 361003410535f the variance explained. Second, interdependence was a positive predictor of six communication variables (all but no information), while bicultural identity was a predictor of four (expert sources, encouraging messages, media channels, and no information [-]). Third, four clusters of associations were discovered: (a) interdependence and traditional identity were associated positively with media and face-to-face channels, (b) interdependence and assimilation were associated positively with family sources and fear messages, (c) marginal identity and equity attributions were associated positively with fear messages and a desire for no information, and (d) bicultural identity and behavioral-environmental attributions were associated positively with encouraging messages and media channels.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 31
Word count: 8143
Text sample:
Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 1 Hispanic Women’s Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source Message and Channel Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of three subjective cultural factors-- self-construals (independence and interdependence) ethnic identity (bicultural assimilation traditional and marginal) and cultural health beliefs (equity and behavioral-environmental attributions)--on source message and channel preferences for receiving breast health information. Hispanic women aged 35 or older (N = 132) completed a self-report questionnaire. An
.18 .07 .18* Media Channels Interdependence .63 .16 .34** Bicultural .33 .09 .30** Traditional .18 .09 .18* Face-to-Face Channels Interdependence .46 .15 .26** No Information Bicultural -.30 .08 -.33** Marginal .23 .07 .27** Equity .21 .08 .18* Traditional -.13 .06 -.16* *p<.05 **p<.01


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