All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 12 prefer to receive information about breast health?” and “Do you look for information about breast cancer? If so, where?” We followed up these questions with probes about sources (“Who is the most influential person?”), messages (“What should people say to get women to do breast cancer screening?”), and channels (“Where do you like to receive the information?”). Second, all of the responses were listed and sorted by all of the current researchers. We organized the list using the source, message, and channel categories. We noted every unique response from the focus groups. Based on these responses (and attempting to use the language of the participants), we developed a 30-item questionnaire to measure communication preference. There were 9 source items, 11 message items, and 10 channel items. We planned to conduct exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis to support the structure and internal consistency of these scales. Demographics. We also included general demographic information and demographic information specifically regarding breast cancer screening practices. The general demographic information included age, ethnic group (i.e., Mexican, Mexican American, Hispanic, Latino, Chicano, other), preferred language, marital status, employment status, income, health insurance, education, and children. Procedures The questionnaire began with instructions and a consent form. We then included the independent variable items, the dependent variable items, and the demographic items. The questionnaire was originally written in English and then translated into Spanish. We had the translation then backtranslated to insure conceptual equivalence. We completed this process in two iterations. Questionnaires were administered primarily through a convenience and snowball process. We recruited participants via community centers in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods, students enrolled at a large, southwestern university, and local health organizations. In each of these settings,

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
first   previous   Page 12 of 31   next   last



background image
Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
12
prefer to receive information about breast health?” and “Do you look for information about breast
cancer? If so, where?” We followed up these questions with probes about sources (“Who is the most
influential person?”), messages (“What should people say to get women to do breast cancer
screening?”), and channels (“Where do you like to receive the information?”).
Second, all of the responses were listed and sorted by all of the current researchers. We
organized the list using the source, message, and channel categories. We noted every unique response
from the focus groups. Based on these responses (and attempting to use the language of the
participants), we developed a 30-item questionnaire to measure communication preference. There were
9 source items, 11 message items, and 10 channel items. We planned to conduct exploratory factor
analysis and reliability analysis to support the structure and internal consistency of these scales.
Demographics. We also included general demographic information and demographic
information specifically regarding breast cancer screening practices. The general demographic
information included age, ethnic group (i.e., Mexican, Mexican American, Hispanic, Latino, Chicano,
other), preferred language, marital status, employment status, income, health insurance, education, and
children.
Procedures
The questionnaire began with instructions and a consent form. We then included the
independent variable items, the dependent variable items, and the demographic items. The
questionnaire was originally written in English and then translated into Spanish. We had the translation
then backtranslated to insure conceptual equivalence. We completed this process in two iterations.
Questionnaires were administered primarily through a convenience and snowball process. We
recruited participants via community centers in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods, students
enrolled at a large, southwestern university, and local health organizations. In each of these settings,


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.