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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 18 6% for face-to-face channels to 36% for no information. The relatively small amount of variance explained in face-to-face channels is not too surprising given the ubiquitous amount of interpersonal communication that people receive. Thus, people with a variety of types of subjective cultural experience would still prefer to receive information in face-to-face channels because it is so common. Family sources was also another variable with relatively small variance explained. Similarly to face-to- face channels, people with a variety of backgrounds are used to receiving information from the family and thus subjective culture is not as important for family sources as other communication variables. Overall, however, the regression equations demonstrate the importance of considering subjective cultural variables for understanding communication preferences. These findings are consistent with Pasick et al.’s (1996) assertion of the importance of understanding subtle and nuanced ways that culture influences health behavior. The most common predictor variable in these equations was interdependent self-construal, followed by bicultural identity. Interdependence was associated positively with all but no information. People with the interdependent self-construal view themselves as connected to other people and thus emphasize interpersonal relationships (Markus & Kitayama, 1991). The communication preference variables (except for no information) all include some level of connectedness to other people. For example, family sources and face-to-face channels directly emphasize relationships, while fear messages included references to the impact of cancer on the family and expert sources emphasize receiving information from a number of people in interpersonal settings. Bicultural identity was related positively to expert sources, encouraging messages, and media channels and negatively to no information. Bicultural individuals have access to a variety of people through their interactions with others and also have a wide repertoire of communication skills (Ting-Toomey et al., 2000). Thus, they are likely to have a wide variety of communication preferences. Other subjective cultural variables

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
18
6% for face-to-face channels to 36% for no information. The relatively small amount of variance
explained in face-to-face channels is not too surprising given the ubiquitous amount of interpersonal
communication that people receive. Thus, people with a variety of types of subjective cultural
experience would still prefer to receive information in face-to-face channels because it is so common.
Family sources was also another variable with relatively small variance explained. Similarly to face-to-
face channels, people with a variety of backgrounds are used to receiving information from the family
and thus subjective culture is not as important for family sources as other communication variables.
Overall, however, the regression equations demonstrate the importance of considering subjective
cultural variables for understanding communication preferences. These findings are consistent with
Pasick et al.’s (1996) assertion of the importance of understanding subtle and nuanced ways that
culture influences health behavior.
The most common predictor variable in these equations was interdependent self-construal,
followed by bicultural identity. Interdependence was associated positively with all but no information.
People with the interdependent self-construal view themselves as connected to other people and thus
emphasize interpersonal relationships (Markus & Kitayama, 1991). The communication preference
variables (except for no information) all include some level of connectedness to other people. For
example, family sources and face-to-face channels directly emphasize relationships, while fear
messages included references to the impact of cancer on the family and expert sources emphasize
receiving information from a number of people in interpersonal settings. Bicultural identity was related
positively to expert sources, encouraging messages, and media channels and negatively to no
information. Bicultural individuals have access to a variety of people through their interactions with
others and also have a wide repertoire of communication skills (Ting-Toomey et al., 2000). Thus, they
are likely to have a wide variety of communication preferences. Other subjective cultural variables


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