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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 19 predicting multiple communication preferences included traditional identity (media channels and no information [-]), marginal identity (expert sources [-] and no information), and equity attributions (fear messages and no information). The correlational and regression analyses indicate four clusters of relationships between subjective culture and communication preferences. In the first cluster, both interdependence and traditional identity were associated positively with media and face-to-face channels. This cluster is one that is stereotypically associated with Hispanic culture (i.e., collectivism) and often used in communication campaigns targeting Hispanic women to increase breast cancer screening (e.g., Castro et al., 1995; Ramirez et al., 1995; Perez-Stable et al., 1996). The second cluster is that interdependence and assimilated identity were related positively with fear messages and family sources. This cluster is somewhat counterintuitive in that assimilated individuals in the U.S. are associated with individualism and self-reliance. However, family relationships are important for individualistic individuals as well as collectivistic individuals (Triandis, 1995). The third cluster is that marginal identity and equity attributions were associated positively with fear messages and no information. Marginalized individuals and those with equity attributions tend to view breast cancer as an event to be fearful of and something that is not entirely within their control (i.e., fatalism) (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, & Mahoney, 2001; Tortolero-Luna et al., 1995). Thus, the fear messages are likely consistent with their reality, but they (or at least part of them) prefer not to hear anything about cancer. The final cluster is bicultural identity and behavior-environmental attributions positive association with encouraging messages and media channels. This cluster is the opposite of the third cluster in that these individuals view that they have control of their lives and want to learn about what they can do about breast cancer (Murguía et al., 2000).

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
19
predicting multiple communication preferences included traditional identity (media channels and no
information [-]), marginal identity (expert sources [-] and no information), and equity attributions (fear
messages and no information).
The correlational and regression analyses indicate four clusters of relationships between
subjective culture and communication preferences. In the first cluster, both interdependence and
traditional identity were associated positively with media and face-to-face channels. This cluster is one
that is stereotypically associated with Hispanic culture (i.e., collectivism) and often used in
communication campaigns targeting Hispanic women to increase breast cancer screening (e.g., Castro
et al., 1995; Ramirez et al., 1995; Perez-Stable et al., 1996). The second cluster is that interdependence
and assimilated identity were related positively with fear messages and family sources. This cluster is
somewhat counterintuitive in that assimilated individuals in the U.S. are associated with individualism
and self-reliance. However, family relationships are important for individualistic individuals as well as
collectivistic individuals (Triandis, 1995). The third cluster is that marginal identity and equity
attributions were associated positively with fear messages and no information. Marginalized
individuals and those with equity attributions tend to view breast cancer as an event to be fearful of and
something that is not entirely within their control (i.e., fatalism) (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, & Mahoney,
2001; Tortolero-Luna et al., 1995). Thus, the fear messages are likely consistent with their reality, but
they (or at least part of them) prefer not to hear anything about cancer. The final cluster is bicultural
identity and behavior-environmental attributions positive association with encouraging messages and
media channels. This cluster is the opposite of the third cluster in that these individuals view that they
have control of their lives and want to learn about what they can do about breast cancer (Murguía et
al., 2000).


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