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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 3 channels for Hispanic women (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Ramirez et al., 1995). However, there has not been a formal investigation about what culturally-appropriate messages and channels entails. Further, the Hispanic ethnic group has a great deal of within group variation and scholars note the importance of not stereotyping all Hispanic women and to examine differences between Hispanic groups (e.g., Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Central American). For example, Ramirez et al. (2000) found that Central American and Cuban women were more likely to utilize mammography than Mexican American women. Finally, comparing within ethnic groups still has the potential to stereotype these women and thus a more effective approach for understanding culture’s influence on communication preferences for breast health information is to use a subjective cultural approach (Pasick, D-Ononfrio, & Otero-Sabogal, 1996). Subjective culture is an individual’s interpretation of the beliefs, values, and norms associated with a culture (Triandis, 1972) and provides a complex approach to investigate the subtle, nuanced ways that culture influences health behavior (Pasick et al., 1996). Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of three factors of subjective culture (self-construal, ethnic identity, and cultural health attributions) on source, message, and channel preferences for breast health information. In this study, we use the Federal government’s designation of “Hispanic,” which the U.S. Census defines as persons whose origins are Spain or the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America and the Caribbean, or persons who identify themselves as Spanish, Spanish American, Hispanic, Hispana(o), or Latina(o). Hispanics constitute approximately 12 percent of the U.S. population, having increased by 58 percent from 22.4 million in 1990 to 35.3 million in the 2000 Census. The U.S. Hispanic population is descended from the following countries or regions: Mexico (58.5%), Puerto Rico (9.6%), Central American (4.8%), South American (3.8%), Cuba (3.5%), or others (17.6%) (U.S. Census, 2001).

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
3
channels for Hispanic women (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Ramirez et al., 1995). However, there has not
been a formal investigation about what culturally-appropriate messages and channels entails. Further,
the Hispanic ethnic group has a great deal of within group variation and scholars note the importance
of not stereotyping all Hispanic women and to examine differences between Hispanic groups (e.g.,
Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Central American). For example, Ramirez et al. (2000) found that
Central American and Cuban women were more likely to utilize mammography than Mexican
American women. Finally, comparing within ethnic groups still has the potential to stereotype these
women and thus a more effective approach for understanding culture’s influence on communication
preferences for breast health information is to use a subjective cultural approach (Pasick, D-Ononfrio,
& Otero-Sabogal, 1996). Subjective culture is an individual’s interpretation of the beliefs, values, and
norms associated with a culture (Triandis, 1972) and provides a complex approach to investigate the
subtle, nuanced ways that culture influences health behavior (Pasick et al., 1996). Thus, the purpose of
this study is to investigate the impact of three factors of subjective culture (self-construal, ethnic
identity, and cultural health attributions) on source, message, and channel preferences for breast health
information.
In this study, we use the Federal government’s designation of “Hispanic,” which the U.S.
Census defines as persons whose origins are Spain or the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America
and the Caribbean, or persons who identify themselves as Spanish, Spanish American, Hispanic,
Hispana(o), or Latina(o). Hispanics constitute approximately 12 percent of the U.S. population, having
increased by 58 percent from 22.4 million in 1990 to 35.3 million in the 2000 Census. The U.S.
Hispanic population is descended from the following countries or regions: Mexico (58.5%), Puerto
Rico (9.6%), Central American (4.8%), South American (3.8%), Cuba (3.5%), or others (17.6%) (U.S.
Census, 2001).


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