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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 4 Subjective Cultural Influences on Communication Preferences How does subjective culture influence communication preferences? We begin this section by reviewing studies that have begun to answer this question. We continue by describing three components of communication preferences in the current study: source, message, and channel. Finally, we define the three subjective cultural elements in the current study and describe how they may influence communication preferences. Communication Preferences Rimer (2000) argued that multiple forms of communication are needed for increasing breast cancer screening rates. She noted that the forms of communication can be complementary and reinforcing and that “we need not view the options as dichotomous choices but instead should pick and choose among them to meet the needs of different people at different times for different topics” (p. 113). However, there has not been a lot of research to investigate how various forms can be used for a particular target audience for breast health information. There are a few exceptions. Yanovitzsky and Blitz (2000) examined responses about mammography and physicians advice from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and media coverage about mammography via content analysis of seven U.S. newspapers. They found that physicians’ recommendation (i.e., interpersonal communication) and mass media coverage had complementary roles in influencing women to have a mammogram. It appeared that media coverage is important for women who do not have regular contact with a physician or access to physicians. This research is important to demonstrate the importance of multiple channels for women, but does not focus on Hispanic women or subjective cultural factors in particular. Prior interventions for increasing breast cancer screening in Hispanic women have demonstrated several “lessons learned” when communicating with this audience. Several interventions

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
4
Subjective Cultural Influences on Communication Preferences
How does subjective culture influence communication preferences? We begin this section by
reviewing studies that have begun to answer this question. We continue by describing three
components of communication preferences in the current study: source, message, and channel. Finally,
we define the three subjective cultural elements in the current study and describe how they may
influence communication preferences.
Communication Preferences
Rimer (2000) argued that multiple forms of communication are needed for increasing breast
cancer screening rates. She noted that the forms of communication can be complementary and
reinforcing and that “we need not view the options as dichotomous choices but instead should pick and
choose among them to meet the needs of different people at different times for different topics” (p.
113). However, there has not been a lot of research to investigate how various forms can be used for a
particular target audience for breast health information. There are a few exceptions.
Yanovitzsky and Blitz (2000) examined responses about mammography and physicians advice
from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and media coverage about mammography via
content analysis of seven U.S. newspapers. They found that physicians’ recommendation (i.e.,
interpersonal communication) and mass media coverage had complementary roles in influencing
women to have a mammogram. It appeared that media coverage is important for women who do not
have regular contact with a physician or access to physicians. This research is important to demonstrate
the importance of multiple channels for women, but does not focus on Hispanic women or subjective
cultural factors in particular.
Prior interventions for increasing breast cancer screening in Hispanic women have
demonstrated several “lessons learned” when communicating with this audience. Several interventions


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