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Hispanic Women's Preferences for Breast Health Information: Subjective Cultural Influences on Source, Message, and Channel
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Communication Preferences 5 (e.g., Castro et al., 1995; Ramirez et al., 1995; Perez-Stable et al., 1996) demonstrated that breast health messages need to be written in English and Spanish, written at a 6 th grade reading level, designed with input from members of the community, and delivered through multiple channels (e.g., interpersonal and mass media). Further, the messages should reference clear cultural values such as respeto (respect), sacrificio (sacrifice), ejemplo (teaching through example), familismo (the importance of family), simpatico (likability/avoidance of interpersonal conflict), and fatalismo (belief in fate/predestined) (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Saint-Germain & Longman, 1993). While these are clearly important lessons to consider when developing and communicating breast health information, a systematic examination of how culture influences communication preferences has yet to be undertaken. Marshall et al. (1995) examined the differences in preferred sources, message, and channels among low-income women in a Breast and Cervical Cancer Control program. In particular they were interested in differences between enrollees and nonenrollees. Ten focus groups were conducted including seven homogeneous groups (three White, two African American, and one each Hispanic and Native American) and three mixed groups (African American and White). The authors found the following: (a) for source, enrollees were more likely to express a desire to hear messages from people with firsthand experience, while nonenrollees valued expert sources, and both groups preferred message from family and friends; (b) for message, both enrollees and nonenrollees expressed a need for general information, logical appeals (without statistics), and positive emotional appeals over fear appeals; and (c) for channel, both enrollees and nonenrollees preferred one-to-one interpersonal communication with enrollees second preference as one-to-many interpersonal contact and nonenrollees second preference as mass communication. The results demonstrated some important

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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background image
Breast Cancer Communication Preferences
5
(e.g., Castro et al., 1995; Ramirez et al., 1995; Perez-Stable et al., 1996) demonstrated that breast
health messages need to be written in English and Spanish, written at a 6
th
grade reading level,
designed with input from members of the community, and delivered through multiple channels (e.g.,
interpersonal and mass media). Further, the messages should reference clear cultural values such as
respeto (respect), sacrificio (sacrifice), ejemplo (teaching through example), familismo (the importance
of family), simpatico (likability/avoidance of interpersonal conflict), and fatalismo (belief in
fate/predestined) (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Saint-Germain & Longman, 1993). While these are clearly
important lessons to consider when developing and communicating breast health information, a
systematic examination of how culture influences communication preferences has yet to be
undertaken.
Marshall et al. (1995) examined the differences in preferred sources, message, and channels
among low-income women in a Breast and Cervical Cancer Control program. In particular they were
interested in differences between enrollees and nonenrollees. Ten focus groups were conducted
including seven homogeneous groups (three White, two African American, and one each Hispanic and
Native American) and three mixed groups (African American and White). The authors found the
following: (a) for source, enrollees were more likely to express a desire to hear messages from people
with firsthand experience, while nonenrollees valued expert sources, and both groups preferred
message from family and friends; (b) for message, both enrollees and nonenrollees expressed a need
for general information, logical appeals (without statistics), and positive emotional appeals over fear
appeals; and (c) for channel, both enrollees and nonenrollees preferred one-to-one interpersonal
communication with enrollees second preference as one-to-many interpersonal contact and
nonenrollees second preference as mass communication. The results demonstrated some important


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