All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

El-Ghorba: A Media Ethnography of Transnationalism among Arab Immigrant Families in Canada
Unformatted Document Text:  daughters attribute their parents’ failure to understand and assimilate into Canadian society to the consumption of Arabic television. One informant explained: Satellite is bad because it isolates you from Canadians. You don’t learn the way they deal… You need to be more connected to Canadians. People who only watch Arabic programs, it has a negative effect on them. She (my mother) needs to know how society works, how to deal with her kids. At the end of this quote is a token of the generational discrepancy that places parent in the position of social failures who are incapable of understanding the changes their kids are undergoing. It is these changes that are core to the notion of transnationalism, the contestation of identities. Another informant explains the outcome of the parental scenario which rejects assimilation: We have a problem establishing our identities here as Arabs in Canada. So instead some people say screw it we don’t belong here. It’s like my friend Bandar. He gets only Arabic satellite at his home. Their television receiver is programmed not to receive any local cable channels. They watched nothing expect Arabic programming. If there was a fire next door, they wouldn’t know because they don’t get local channels. What this informant is explaining is the consequence of the contention that makes the migrant reject the local and aspire for the foreign. Perhaps even more complicated, the exclusive access to Arabic satellite TV may perhaps help recreate the foreign in a domestic locale, thereby rejuvenating the homeland into a different spatial sphere. The same informant continues to describe the shortcomings this has had on his friend Bandar. Even after so many years of schooling in Halifax’s high schools and college, his English is still crappy compared to the rest of us who came at the same time he did Bandar himself acknowledges this inability to relate to Canadian society as a whole, and to individuals specifically: I never go out with Canadians because I don’t understand anything they say. I don’t understand their humor and the topics they discuss are different from ours. So Bandar resorts to excluding anything Canadian from his life. Even after living in Halifax for six years, he looks forward to the day when he graduates from college and leave back for the Middle East. He’s unsure why he needs to be ‘there’, but is knows he doesn’t want to be ‘here’. Four months ago we got the satellite channels. We got it because my mom felt we were losing our Egyptian traditions and because my sister was losing her sense of language and culture. Even though my mom wanted it for her own entertainment as well. She always wanted to stay in touch. My mother never really watched any English language television. I on the other hand, watched nothing but English TV programs.

Authors: Iskandar Farag, Adel.
first   previous   Page 11 of 19   next   last



background image
daughters attribute their parents’ failure to understand and assimilate into Canadian society to the
consumption of Arabic television.
One informant explained:

Satellite is bad because it isolates you from Canadians. You don’t learn the way they deal… You
need to be more connected to Canadians. People who only watch Arabic programs, it has a
negative effect on them. She (my mother) needs to know how society works, how to deal with her
kids.
At the end of this quote is a token of the generational discrepancy that places parent in
the position of social failures who are incapable of understanding the changes their kids are
undergoing. It is these changes that are core to the notion of transnationalism, the contestation of
identities.
Another informant explains the outcome of the parental scenario which rejects assimilation:

We have a problem establishing our identities here as Arabs in Canada. So instead some people
say screw it we don’t belong here. It’s like my friend Bandar. He gets only Arabic satellite at his
home. Their television receiver is programmed not to receive any local cable channels. They
watched nothing expect Arabic programming. If there was a fire next door, they wouldn’t know
because they don’t get local channels.
What this informant is explaining is the consequence of the contention that makes the
migrant reject the local and aspire for the foreign. Perhaps even more complicated, the exclusive
access to Arabic satellite TV may perhaps help recreate the foreign in a domestic locale, thereby
rejuvenating the homeland into a different spatial sphere.
The same informant continues to describe the shortcomings this has had on his friend Bandar.

Even after so many years of schooling in Halifax’s high schools and college, his English is still
crappy compared to the rest of us who came at the same time he did
Bandar himself acknowledges this inability to relate to Canadian society as a whole, and
to individuals specifically:
I never go out with Canadians because I don’t understand anything they say. I don’t understand
their humor and the topics they discuss are different from ours.
So Bandar resorts to excluding anything Canadian from his life. Even after living in
Halifax for six years, he looks forward to the day when he graduates from college and leave back
for the Middle East. He’s unsure why he needs to be ‘there’, but is knows he doesn’t want to be
‘here’.
Four months ago we got the satellite channels. We got it because my mom felt we were losing
our Egyptian traditions and because my sister was losing her sense of language and culture.
Even though my mom wanted it for her own entertainment as well. She always wanted to stay in
touch. My mother never really watched any English language television. I on the other hand,
watched nothing but English TV programs.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 19   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.