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Emotional effects of advertising on young adults of lower socio-economic status
Unformatted Document Text:  Ads, family income, and young adults 1 Emotional effects of advertising on children of lower socio-economic status Introduction Traditional hierarchy-of-effects models of advertising state that advertising exposure leads to cognitions, such as memory about the ad, the product and/or the brand; which in turn leads to attitudes, such as product liking and attitude toward possible purchase; which in the end leads to behaviors, such as buying the advertised product (Albion & Farris, 1981). One issue that has not been raised in this area of research is what happens to a consumer who is not able to carry out the desired behavior because of lack of economic resources. Research has suggested that people of lesser economic means are particularly harmed by constant media messages of consumerism because they have no way to relieve the created consumerist wants and desires (West, 1994). It is possible that the inability to pursue wants and desires evoked by ads for luxury products could lead to differential patterns of emotional cognitive responding during processing of an advertisement. This study investigates differences in emotional and cognitive responses as revealed through physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance, and facial EMG) for young college students of different socio-economic levels. Advertising , materialism, and SES One of the established effects of advertising is that it increases peoples’ desires for consumer goods and promotes materialism. Some researchers, e.g., Galbraith (1967), even see advertising as "relentless propaganda on behalf of goods in general." Advertising, it is argued, stirs, or creates, desires and needs in people for more material goods. These needs are never completely satisfied, however, because, once a product is bought, a new one appears in the market to replace it, creating yet a new need (Galbraith, 1958). Thus, as Crisp (1987) argues, advertising overrides a consumer’s autonomy of decision making in the creation of these desires, by offering an unshakable link between products and the fulfillment of desires for them. A number of studies have investigated the association between advertising and materialism levels, but none has focused specifically on the role of socio-economic status as a potential intervening variable in that process. Nevertheless, the findings of previous research on advertising, materialism levels, and demographics are instructive in the formulation of a proposition to be tested in this research. In general, materialism is defined as the idea that people gain personal satisfaction from owning objects (Yoon, 1995). Further, materialism is a consumer value characterized by possessiveness, non-generosity and envy

Authors: Mendelson, Andrew. and Bolls, Paul.
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background image
Ads, family income, and young adults
1
Emotional effects of advertising on children of lower socio-economic status
Introduction
Traditional hierarchy-of-effects models of advertising state that advertising exposure leads to cognitions,
such as memory about the ad, the product and/or the brand; which in turn leads to attitudes, such as product liking
and attitude toward possible purchase; which in the end leads to behaviors, such as buying the advertised product
(Albion & Farris, 1981). One issue that has not been raised in this area of research is what happens to a consumer
who is not able to carry out the desired behavior because of lack of economic resources. Research has suggested
that people of lesser economic means are particularly harmed by constant media messages of consumerism because
they have no way to relieve the created consumerist wants and desires (West, 1994). It is possible that the inability
to pursue wants and desires evoked by ads for luxury products could lead to differential patterns of emotional
cognitive responding during processing of an advertisement. This study investigates differences in emotional and
cognitive responses as revealed through physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance, and facial EMG) for
young college students of different socio-economic levels.
Advertising , materialism, and SES
One of the established effects of advertising is that it increases peoples’ desires for consumer goods and
promotes materialism. Some researchers, e.g., Galbraith (1967), even see advertising as "relentless propaganda on
behalf of goods in general." Advertising, it is argued, stirs, or creates, desires and needs in people for more material
goods. These needs are never completely satisfied, however, because, once a product is bought, a new one appears
in the market to replace it, creating yet a new need (Galbraith, 1958). Thus, as Crisp (1987) argues, advertising
overrides a consumer’s autonomy of decision making in the creation of these desires, by offering an unshakable link
between products and the fulfillment of desires for them.
A number of studies have investigated the association between advertising and materialism levels, but none
has focused specifically on the role of socio-economic status as a potential intervening variable in that process.
Nevertheless, the findings of previous research on advertising, materialism levels, and demographics are instructive
in the formulation of a proposition to be tested in this research.
In general, materialism is defined as the idea that people gain personal satisfaction from owning objects
(Yoon, 1995). Further, materialism is a consumer value characterized by possessiveness, non-generosity and envy


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