All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Responding to Activism: An Experimental Analysis of Public Relations Strategy Influence on Beliefs, Attitudes, and Behavioral Intentions
Unformatted Document Text:  Responding to Activism (ICA-15-11621) 18 Tests of Hypotheses To test Hypothesis 1, hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well the attitude and subjective norm measures predicted behavioral intention. Separate analyses were on the two sets of measures regarding behavioral intention, attitude and subjective norm for eating at McDonald’s and eating meat at McDonald’s. In the first analysis, the standardized measure of intention to eat at McDonald’s served as the dependent variable. This measure was regressed on the measures of subjective norm regarding eating at McDonald’s and attitude toward eating at McDonald’s. The subjective norm measure was entered in step 1 of the equation. The addition of attitude toward eating at McDonald’s to the equation in step 2 accounted for a significant increase in explained variance in intention to eat at McDonald’s, from 21% to 50%. The measures of attitude toward eating at McDonald’s and subjective norm regarding eating at McDonald’s explained 50% of the variance in the intention to eat at McDonald’s measure, F(2,170)=83.44, p= .000. The main effects of subjective norm regarding eating at McDonald’s were controlled by entering them on the first step. Only attitude toward eating at McDonald’s was significant as a unique predictor (B=.63, p= .000). Regression coefficients and squared multiple correlations are reported in Table 3. In the second analysis, the standardized measure of intention to eat meat at McDonald’s served as the dependent variable. This measure was regressed on the measures of subjective norm regarding eating meat at McDonald’s and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s. The subjective norm measure was entered in step 1 of the equation. The addition of attitude to the equation in step 2 accounted for a significant increase in variance in intention to eat meat at McDonald’s, from 24% to 53%. The attitude and subjective norm measures explained 53% of the variance in intention to eat meat at McDonald’s, F(2,170)=95.23, p= .001. The main effects of subjective norm were controlled by entering it on the first step. Again, only attitude toward eating at McDonald’s was significant as a unique predictor (B=.68, p=.000). Regression coefficients and squared multiple correlations are reported in Table 4. Correlations among the independent variables and dependent variables used in the tests of Hypothesis 1 were significant (p< .001), and relatively high. Correlation coefficients are reported in Table 5. These findings support Hypothesis 1. Attitude toward behavior and subjective norm regarding behavior predict behavioral intention. In addition, attitude toward behavior appears to be is a stronger predictor of behavioral intention than subjective norm regarding behavior. To test Hypothesis 2, linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well salient beliefs predict attitude toward behavior. Data analysis was conducted separately on the measures for attitude toward eating at McDonald’s and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s. In the first analysis, attitude toward eating at McDonald’s, the dependent variable, was regressed on the measure of beliefs about

Authors: Page, Kelly.
first   previous   Page 19 of 39   next   last



background image
Responding to Activism (ICA-15-11621)
18
Tests of Hypotheses
To test Hypothesis 1, hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well the attitude
and subjective norm measures predicted behavioral intention. Separate analyses were on the two sets of
measures regarding behavioral intention, attitude and subjective norm for eating at McDonald’s and
eating meat at McDonald’s.
In the first analysis, the standardized measure of intention to eat at McDonald’s served as the
dependent variable. This measure was regressed on the measures of subjective norm regarding eating at
McDonald’s and attitude toward eating at McDonald’s. The subjective norm measure was entered in step
1 of the equation. The addition of attitude toward eating at McDonald’s to the equation in step 2
accounted for a significant increase in explained variance in intention to eat at McDonald’s, from 21% to
50%. The measures of attitude toward eating at McDonald’s and subjective norm regarding eating at
McDonald’s explained 50% of the variance in the intention to eat at McDonald’s measure,
F(2,170)=83.44, p= .000. The main effects of subjective norm regarding eating at McDonald’s were
controlled by entering them on the first step. Only attitude toward eating at McDonald’s was significant
as a unique predictor (B=.63, p= .000). Regression coefficients and squared multiple correlations are
reported in Table 3.
In the second analysis, the standardized measure of intention to eat meat at McDonald’s served as the
dependent variable. This measure was regressed on the measures of subjective norm regarding eating
meat at McDonald’s and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s. The subjective norm measure was
entered in step 1 of the equation. The addition of attitude to the equation in step 2 accounted for a
significant increase in variance in intention to eat meat at McDonald’s, from 24% to 53%. The attitude
and subjective norm measures explained 53% of the variance in intention to eat meat at McDonald’s,
F(2,170)=95.23, p= .001. The main effects of subjective norm were controlled by entering it on the first
step. Again, only attitude toward eating at McDonald’s was significant as a unique predictor (B=.68,
p=.000). Regression coefficients and squared multiple correlations are reported in Table 4.
Correlations among the independent variables and dependent variables used in the tests of Hypothesis
1 were significant (p< .001), and relatively high. Correlation coefficients are reported in Table 5.
These findings support Hypothesis 1. Attitude toward behavior and subjective norm regarding
behavior predict behavioral intention. In addition, attitude toward behavior appears to be is a stronger
predictor of behavioral intention than subjective norm regarding behavior.
To test Hypothesis 2, linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well salient beliefs
predict attitude toward behavior. Data analysis was conducted separately on the measures for attitude
toward eating at McDonald’s and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s. In the first analysis, attitude
toward eating at McDonald’s, the dependent variable, was regressed on the measure of beliefs about


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.