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Responding to Activism: An Experimental Analysis of Public Relations Strategy Influence on Beliefs, Attitudes, and Behavioral Intentions
Unformatted Document Text:  Responding to Activism (ICA-15-11621) 20 To test Hypothesis 4, linear regression analysis was conducted to determine the prediction of salient beliefs from attitude toward strategy. A scatterplot for the two variables indicated a positive linear relationship. The correlation between attitude toward strategy and beliefs about McDonald’s was strong, r=.64, F(1, 165)=114.65, p=.000. Approximately 41% of the variance in beliefs about McDonald’s was explained by its linear relationship with attitude toward strategy, indicating a high level of accuracy in the prediction. This result supports Hypothesis 4. After testing Hypothesis 4, an analysis was conducted to determine if strategy type had a direct effect on salient beliefs. Although this is not predicted by the theory of reasoned action or the hypotheses, it is possible that direct effects between strategy type and salient beliefs may be present. Two tests were conducted to determine the relationship between public relations strategies and salient beliefs. First, the nine experimental conditions were collapsed into two groups, response message treatments and control treatments, and an independent-samples t test was conducted to determine if there were differences in beliefs about McDonald’s between the two groups. Results indicate that the mean for beliefs about McDonald’s was significantly higher when a response message treatment was used (M =28.86, SD=5.73) than when a control treatment was used (M =26.44, SD=6.47), t(167)=2.18, p=.047. This suggests that beliefs about McDonald’s were more favorable among subjects who were exposed to a McDonald’s response messages than subjects who were not exposed to a McDonald’s response message. Next, ANOVA was conducted to evaluate the relationship between treatment type and beliefs about McDonald’s. The dependent variable was the measure of beliefs about McDonald’s and the independent variable was treatment type with nine levels. The strength of relationship between the treatments and beliefs about McDonald’s, as assessed by η 2 , was weak, with treatment type accounting for only 5.2% of the variance in beliefs about McDonald’s, F(1,160)=1.10, p=.365. To test Hypotheses 5 and 6, correlation analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between attitude toward strategy, attitude toward behavior, and behavioral intention. Results indicate that attitude toward strategy is positively related to attitude toward behavior and behavioral intention. Specifically, attitude toward strategy and attitude toward eating at McDonald’s had a significant positive relationship, r=.25, p=.001. Similarly, attitude toward strategy and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s had a significant positive relationship, r=.29, p=.000. Attitude toward strategy and intention to eat at McDonald’s were positively related, but this relationship was not significant, r=.14, p=.076. Attitude toward strategy and intention to eat meat at McDonald’s were positively related, and this relationship was significant, r=.16, F(.040. Partial correlations were then conducted to determine if attitude toward strategy was related to attitude toward behavior when salient beliefs were held constant. Results indicated no significant relationships. Partial correlations were also computed for attitude toward strategy and behavioral intention when attitude toward behavior and salient beliefs were held constant. Again, no

Authors: Page, Kelly.
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Responding to Activism (ICA-15-11621)
20
To test Hypothesis 4, linear regression analysis was conducted to determine the prediction of salient
beliefs from attitude toward strategy. A scatterplot for the two variables indicated a positive linear
relationship. The correlation between attitude toward strategy and beliefs about McDonald’s was strong,
r=.64, F(1, 165)=114.65, p=.000. Approximately 41% of the variance in beliefs about McDonald’s was
explained by its linear relationship with attitude toward strategy, indicating a high level of accuracy in the
prediction. This result supports Hypothesis 4.
After testing Hypothesis 4, an analysis was conducted to determine if strategy type had a direct effect
on salient beliefs. Although this is not predicted by the theory of reasoned action or the hypotheses, it is
possible that direct effects between strategy type and salient beliefs may be present. Two tests were
conducted to determine the relationship between public relations strategies and salient beliefs. First, the
nine experimental conditions were collapsed into two groups, response message treatments and control
treatments, and an independent-samples t test was conducted to determine if there were differences in
beliefs about McDonald’s between the two groups. Results indicate that the mean for beliefs about
McDonald’s was significantly higher when a response message treatment was used (M =28.86, SD=5.73)
than when a control treatment was used (M =26.44, SD=6.47), t(167)=2.18, p=.047. This suggests that
beliefs about McDonald’s were more favorable among subjects who were exposed to a McDonald’s
response messages than subjects who were not exposed to a McDonald’s response message.
Next, ANOVA was conducted to evaluate the relationship between treatment type and beliefs about
McDonald’s. The dependent variable was the measure of beliefs about McDonald’s and the independent
variable was treatment type with nine levels. The strength of relationship between the treatments and
beliefs about McDonald’s, as assessed by
η
2
, was weak, with treatment type accounting for only 5.2% of
the variance in beliefs about McDonald’s, F(1,160)=1.10, p=.365.
To test Hypotheses 5 and 6, correlation analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between
attitude toward strategy, attitude toward behavior, and behavioral intention. Results indicate that attitude
toward strategy is positively related to attitude toward behavior and behavioral intention. Specifically,
attitude toward strategy and attitude toward eating at McDonald’s had a significant positive relationship,
r=.25, p=.001. Similarly, attitude toward strategy and attitude toward eating meat at McDonald’s had a
significant positive relationship, r=.29, p=.000. Attitude toward strategy and intention to eat at
McDonald’s were positively related, but this relationship was not significant, r=.14, p=.076. Attitude
toward strategy and intention to eat meat at McDonald’s were positively related, and this relationship was
significant, r=.16, F(.040. Partial correlations were then conducted to determine if attitude toward
strategy was related to attitude toward behavior when salient beliefs were held constant. Results indicated
no significant relationships. Partial correlations were also computed for attitude toward strategy and
behavioral intention when attitude toward behavior and salient beliefs were held constant. Again, no


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