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The Utility of Coorientational Variables as Predictors of Willingness to Negotiate
Unformatted Document Text:  Utility of Coorientational Variables / Page 4 McLeod, 1968; McLeod & Chaffee, 1973), according to which participants were asked to evaluate the willingness to negotiate, power and trustworthiness of each group (including their own) prior to engaging in the exercise. Findings indicated that the perceived trustworthiness of an external group positively affected an organization’s willingness to negotiate with that group, while high perceived power tended to reduce willingness. The influence of perceived trustworthiness remained significant when perceived power was taken into account. While the measurement model of coorientation has often been used to empirically assess relations between two parties (individuals or groups), this study considers the further possibility that coorientation variables themselves – specifically, agreement between evaluations and the accuracy of perceptions -- may have value as predictors of willingness to negotiate. Coorientation Based on Heider's (1958) balance theory, the A-B-X model proposed by Newcomb (1953) assesses symmetry in interpersonal relations by examining how two parties, A and B, orient to object or issue X in the environment. Chaffee and McLeod's measurement model of coorientation (Chaffee & McLeod, 1968; McLeod & Chaffee, 1973) provides a means of measuring relations between A and B by assessing agreement (the degree to which the actual evaluations of two parties are similar), accuracy (the degree to which one party's perception of the other party's evaluation is similar to the other party's actual evaluation), and congruency (the degree of similarity between a party's own evaluation and its perception of the other party's evaluation). Much of the early coorientational research involved applications to relations at an interpersonal level; however, the measurement model has been applied fairly extensively at other levels of analysis. The appropriateness of applying coorientation at a group level has been

Authors: Christen, Cindy.
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Utility of Coorientational Variables / Page 4
McLeod, 1968; McLeod & Chaffee, 1973), according to which participants were asked to
evaluate the willingness to negotiate, power and trustworthiness of each group (including their
own) prior to engaging in the exercise. Findings indicated that the perceived trustworthiness of
an external group positively affected an organization’s willingness to negotiate with that group,
while high perceived power tended to reduce willingness. The influence of perceived
trustworthiness remained significant when perceived power was taken into account.
While the measurement model of coorientation has often been used to empirically assess
relations between two parties (individuals or groups), this study considers the further possibility
that coorientation variables themselves – specifically, agreement between evaluations and the
accuracy of perceptions -- may have value as predictors of willingness to negotiate.
Coorientation
Based on Heider's (1958) balance theory, the A-B-X model proposed by Newcomb
(1953) assesses symmetry in interpersonal relations by examining how two parties, A and B,
orient to object or issue X in the environment. Chaffee and McLeod's measurement model of
coorientation (Chaffee & McLeod, 1968; McLeod & Chaffee, 1973) provides a means of
measuring relations between A and B by assessing agreement (the degree to which the actual
evaluations of two parties are similar), accuracy (the degree to which one party's perception of
the other party's evaluation is similar to the other party's actual evaluation), and congruency (the
degree of similarity between a party's own evaluation and its perception of the other party's
evaluation).
Much of the early coorientational research involved applications to relations at an
interpersonal level; however, the measurement model has been applied fairly extensively at other
levels of analysis. The appropriateness of applying coorientation at a group level has been


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