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Are borders only georgaphic? A case study of whether framing of women’s rights as human rights is successful at the domestic level
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing women’s rights as human rights 12 Generally, NGOs are not satisfied by their cooperation with the states. They face challenges of the implementation of the constitutional principles of general human rights and women human rights in particular (Feminist League, 1997; Women’s Movement in Russia, 2002). NGOs point out that many governmental officials are not ready to implement programs on gender and are not well prepared to do so (Russian alternative report, 1999). Often alternative reports do not address the issues covered or not covered in the governmental reports and often do not challenge states to demonstrate the results of their previous promises. Thus, NGOs of this region do not use accountability politics as a tactic to address the issue. For example, the Belarus national plan of action (Republic of Belarus, 1996) listed 17 activities that it planed to implement in 1996-2000. No results of the implementation on any of the activities can be found. None of the national or regional NGOs addressed this problem at the Beijing+5 meetings. The Belarus governmental report does not address these activities either, Rather, it provides general information about the legal rights of women to be equal with men and on the high level of female education in the republic answering to the information politics as a tactic used by international NGOs in the frame women’s rights as human rights (Republic of Belarus, 2000). Clearly, governments have quite persuasive reports on the implementation. The few alternative reports presented in the Beijing+5 meetings have no effect on the governments of these countries and seem not to be noticed by international NGOs. Arrogant governmental statements, such as “Uzbek women are the most educated women in the world” (Uzbekistan, 2000), are challenged neither by national NGOs (no Uzbekistan alternative report exists) nor by international NGOs which participate in the Beijing+5 activities. Moreover, NGOs from these countries do not address this problem at the international level. For example, they do

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina.
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Framing women’s rights as human rights
12
Generally, NGOs are not satisfied by their cooperation with the states. They face
challenges of the implementation of the constitutional principles of general human rights and
women human rights in particular (Feminist League, 1997; Women’s Movement in Russia,
2002). NGOs point out that many governmental officials are not ready to implement programs
on gender and are not well prepared to do so (Russian alternative report, 1999).
Often alternative reports do not address the issues covered or not covered in the
governmental reports and often do not challenge states to demonstrate the results of their
previous promises. Thus, NGOs of this region do not use accountability politics as a tactic to
address the issue. For example, the Belarus national plan of action (Republic of Belarus, 1996)
listed 17 activities that it planed to implement in 1996-2000. No results of the implementation on
any of the activities can be found. None of the national or regional NGOs addressed this problem
at the Beijing+5 meetings. The Belarus governmental report does not address these activities
either, Rather, it provides general information about the legal rights of women to be equal with
men and on the high level of female education in the republic answering to the information
politics as a tactic used by international NGOs in the frame women’s rights as human rights
(Republic of Belarus, 2000). Clearly, governments have quite persuasive reports on the
implementation.
The few alternative reports presented in the Beijing+5 meetings have no effect on the
governments of these countries and seem not to be noticed by international NGOs. Arrogant
governmental statements, such as “Uzbek women are the most educated women in the world”
(Uzbekistan, 2000), are challenged neither by national NGOs (no Uzbekistan alternative report
exists) nor by international NGOs which participate in the Beijing+5 activities. Moreover, NGOs
from these countries do not address this problem at the international level. For example, they do


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