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Are borders only georgaphic? A case study of whether framing of women’s rights as human rights is successful at the domestic level
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing women’s rights as human rights 16 practice, equality between men and women (women got paid less than men, stereotypes about women’s roles of housewives were strong in the society) did not exist in the U.S.S.R., so women learned not to perceive women’s rights seriously (Rimashevskaia). The fact that women’s rights exist does not say anything to women form this region because they do not believe in practical application of these laws. Statements made in the frame of women’s rights as human rights are often empty sounds for the publics at the domestic level (Kay, 2000). Feminism is negatively perceived not only by men but also by women themselves. Addressing any women’s issues can often be labeled as feministic talk which challenge norms accepted in the society (Kay, 2000). Women’s NGOs in countries of the former Soviet Union now face a challenge of explaining and informing publics about women’s rights issues without being labeled a radical feminist group (Zavadskaya, 2000). Media in these countries generally support these stereotypes of feminism. Lack of awareness among publics spreads over to the journalists and editors who often reject to write on serious issues of women’s rights (Kay, 2000) or write about women’s rights issues with humor and even sarcasm (Azhgikhina, 2000, June 6). As one can see, framing women’s rights as human rights face thus far was not being able to solve this problem. Finally, a lack of coalition and unity among the NGOs in these countries and in the region as a whole as well as a lack of communication on the international arena between NGOs and states creates a problem for a successful implementation of the frame of women’s rights as human rights. The number of delegates-representatives of NGOs from these countries on the international forums and conferences remain low. None of the 15 countries delegations included NGO representative neither in 1995 nor in 2000 (United Nations, 2000b).

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina.
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Framing women’s rights as human rights
16
practice, equality between men and women (women got paid less than men, stereotypes about
women’s roles of housewives were strong in the society) did not exist in the U.S.S.R., so women
learned not to perceive women’s rights seriously (Rimashevskaia). The fact that women’s rights
exist does not say anything to women form this region because they do not believe in practical
application of these laws. Statements made in the frame of women’s rights as human rights are
often empty sounds for the publics at the domestic level (Kay, 2000). Feminism is negatively
perceived not only by men but also by women themselves. Addressing any women’s issues can
often be labeled as feministic talk which challenge norms accepted in the society (Kay, 2000).
Women’s NGOs in countries of the former Soviet Union now face a challenge of explaining and
informing publics about women’s rights issues without being labeled a radical feminist group
(Zavadskaya, 2000).
Media in these countries generally support these stereotypes of feminism. Lack of
awareness among publics spreads over to the journalists and editors who often reject to write on
serious issues of women’s rights (Kay, 2000) or write about women’s rights issues with humor
and even sarcasm (Azhgikhina, 2000, June 6). As one can see, framing women’s rights as human
rights face thus far was not being able to solve this problem.
Finally, a lack of coalition and unity among the NGOs in these countries and in the
region as a whole as well as a lack of communication on the international arena between NGOs
and states creates a problem for a successful implementation of the frame of women’s rights as
human rights.
The number of delegates-representatives of NGOs from these countries on the
international forums and conferences remain low. None of the 15 countries delegations included
NGO representative neither in 1995 nor in 2000 (United Nations, 2000b).


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