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Are borders only georgaphic? A case study of whether framing of women’s rights as human rights is successful at the domestic level
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing women’s rights as human rights 18 The lack of communication among NGOs is obvious to the government representatives such as Sliska, First Deputy Speaker of the Russian Duma who said, ”Our women organizations – like the swan, the crayfish and the pike – have not created a united powerful movement. Of course, there should be a common ideology for attaining and promoting the idea of real equality” (We/Myi, 2000, p. 2). The participation of women’s NGOs from these countries in Eastern European coalitions is extremely low: only three countries, for example, Moldova, Ukraine, and Russia, were presented by total of five NGOs in the first Eastern European network Karat Coalition for promoting the Platform for Action (Lohmann, 2000). Some NGO leaders, such as Lipovskaya, director of the St. Petersburg Center for Gender Issues, understand the necessity to unite in order to achieve their goals (We/Myi, 2000). Unfortunately, so far, no coalitions or networks were created by NGOs from countries in the former Soviet Union themselves. As one can see, the limited work has been done by NGOs of this region to unite and address their specific concerns. Specific-region concerns that could be addressed by NGO coalitions on the international stage, should include problems discussed earlier in this section: NGO legitimacy, negative image of feminism and feminist organizations, and a lack of communication with governments as well as with NGOs in other countries of the former Soviet Union. Transnational advocacy networks on women’s rights do not include the large enough number of NGOs from this region: because of the frame of women’s rights as human rights, international NGOs work and listen to only those NGOs from the region that are able to use this framework. At the same time, these NGOs struggle to apply this framework at the domestic level and to communicate it to the general publics. Therefore, Keck and Sikkink (1998) theory effectively explain how networks actively use the stages of influence to affect states’ behaviors

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina.
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background image
Framing women’s rights as human rights
18
The lack of communication among NGOs is obvious to the government representatives
such as Sliska, First Deputy Speaker of the Russian Duma who said, ”Our women organizations
– like the swan, the crayfish and the pike – have not created a united powerful movement. Of
course, there should be a common ideology for attaining and promoting the idea of real equality”
(We/Myi, 2000, p. 2).
The participation of women’s NGOs from these countries in Eastern European coalitions
is extremely low: only three countries, for example, Moldova, Ukraine, and Russia, were
presented by total of five NGOs in the first Eastern European network Karat Coalition for
promoting the Platform for Action (Lohmann, 2000). Some NGO leaders, such as Lipovskaya,
director of the St. Petersburg Center for Gender Issues, understand the necessity to unite in order
to achieve their goals (We/Myi, 2000). Unfortunately, so far, no coalitions or networks were
created by NGOs from countries in the former Soviet Union themselves.
As one can see, the limited work has been done by NGOs of this region to unite and
address their specific concerns. Specific-region concerns that could be addressed by NGO
coalitions on the international stage, should include problems discussed earlier in this section:
NGO legitimacy, negative image of feminism and feminist organizations, and a lack of
communication with governments as well as with NGOs in other countries of the former Soviet
Union. Transnational advocacy networks on women’s rights do not include the large enough
number of NGOs from this region: because of the frame of women’s rights as human rights,
international NGOs work and listen to only those NGOs from the region that are able to use this
framework. At the same time, these NGOs struggle to apply this framework at the domestic level
and to communicate it to the general publics. Therefore, Keck and Sikkink (1998) theory
effectively explain how networks actively use the stages of influence to affect states’ behaviors


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