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Are borders only georgaphic? A case study of whether framing of women’s rights as human rights is successful at the domestic level
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing women’s rights as human rights 5 the major problems which exist in the region in regard to the implementation of the Platform for Action and point out possible solutions of the problem. I argue that the theory of transnational advocacy networks, particularly its framing component, needs to be developed further to address social and cultural particularities of different regions and to make frames work more successfully at the domestic levels. The theoretical contribution of this paper is in illustrating how the different tactics of networks can be used to reframe the issue of women’s rights. Framing as an essential networks’ strategy Keck and Sikkink (1998) see transnational advocacy network as central to their theory of international relations. By transnational advocacy network one should understand a form of international organization with voluntary, horizontal patterns of communication and exchange that “promote causes, principled ideas, and norms” and unite individuals “advocating policy changes that cannot be easily linked to a rationalist understanding of their ‘interests’” (pp. 8- 9). NGOs play a central role in networks by introducing new ideas, initiating actions, and pressuring more powerful actors to take positions and recognize responsibilities. Women organizations, therefore, can be seen as such transnational advocacy network, according to Keck and Sikkink. The construction of frames is essential in networks’ strategies. Frames help to organize and guide actions and aim to influence broader public understandings. Keck and Sikkink (1998) expanded the concept of framing provided by Snow and Benford (1992) by demonstrating that the process of framing is essential to the networks. According to Keck and Sikkink, many networks use framing to address old problems in new ways or to “transform other actors’ understandings of their identities and their interests” (p. 17).

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina.
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Framing women’s rights as human rights
5
the major problems which exist in the region in regard to the implementation of the Platform for
Action and point out possible solutions of the problem. I argue that the theory of transnational
advocacy networks, particularly its framing component, needs to be developed further to address
social and cultural particularities of different regions and to make frames work more successfully
at the domestic levels. The theoretical contribution of this paper is in illustrating how the
different tactics of networks can be used to reframe the issue of women’s rights.
Framing as an essential networks’ strategy
Keck and Sikkink (1998) see transnational advocacy network as central to their theory of
international relations. By transnational advocacy network one should understand a form of
international organization with voluntary, horizontal patterns of communication and exchange
that “promote causes, principled ideas, and norms” and unite individuals “advocating policy
changes that cannot be easily linked to a rationalist understanding of their ‘interests’” (pp. 8- 9).
NGOs play a central role in networks by introducing new ideas, initiating actions, and pressuring
more powerful actors to take positions and recognize responsibilities. Women organizations,
therefore, can be seen as such transnational advocacy network, according to Keck and Sikkink.
The construction of frames is essential in networks’ strategies. Frames help to organize
and guide actions and aim to influence broader public understandings. Keck and Sikkink (1998)
expanded the concept of framing provided by Snow and Benford (1992) by demonstrating that
the process of framing is essential to the networks. According to Keck and Sikkink, many
networks use framing to address old problems in new ways or to “transform other actors’
understandings of their identities and their interests” (p. 17).


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