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Risk and Efficacy as Motivators of Change: Test of the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA) Framework

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Abstract:

Derived from the extended parallel process model (EPPM; Witte, 1992, 1994), the risk perception attitude (RPA) framework categorizes individuals into four groups on the basis of their risk perception and efficacy beliefs. These four groups – avoidance (high risk, low efficacy), responsive (high risk, high efficacy), proactive (low risk, high efficacy), and indifference (low risk, low efficacy) – are predicted to differ in various health outcomes. Prior research found that the avoidance group expressed more healthy intentions than the other three groups. Researchers hypothesized that this unexpected finding was due to participants’ prior knowledge about their low-risk status, which caused them not to believe the high-risk diagnosis they received. The current study was undertaken to test this “incredulity hypothesis” by conducting an experiment with diabetes, a disease that participants knew little about. In a 2 x 2 between-subjects (N = 134) experiment, participants’ risk and efficacy beliefs were manipulated to determine how these variables influenced self-protective motivation, intention to seek information, actual information seeking, knowledge acquisition, and behavioral intention. Results were mixed, but the risk x efficacy interaction was significantly related with three outcomes. Results are discussed in the context of the EPPM-based findings.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

risk (179), efficaci (99), particip (82), diabet (77), high (74), rpa (70), group (69), framework (64), behavior (57), inform (56), low (52), manipul (45), knowledg (40), p (38), percept (38), respons (38), belief (38), question (32), studi (32), test (31), self (30),

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risk perception, efficacy beliefs, diabetes, behavior change, self-protective motivation
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Rimal, Rajiv., Morrison, Dan. and Mitchell, Monique. "Risk and Efficacy as Motivators of Change: Test of the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA) Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111435_index.html>

APA Citation:

Rimal, R. N., Morrison, D. and Mitchell, M. , 2003-05-27 "Risk and Efficacy as Motivators of Change: Test of the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA) Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111435_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Derived from the extended parallel process model (EPPM; Witte, 1992, 1994), the risk perception attitude (RPA) framework categorizes individuals into four groups on the basis of their risk perception and efficacy beliefs. These four groups – avoidance (high risk, low efficacy), responsive (high risk, high efficacy), proactive (low risk, high efficacy), and indifference (low risk, low efficacy) – are predicted to differ in various health outcomes. Prior research found that the avoidance group expressed more healthy intentions than the other three groups. Researchers hypothesized that this unexpected finding was due to participants’ prior knowledge about their low-risk status, which caused them not to believe the high-risk diagnosis they received. The current study was undertaken to test this “incredulity hypothesis” by conducting an experiment with diabetes, a disease that participants knew little about. In a 2 x 2 between-subjects (N = 134) experiment, participants’ risk and efficacy beliefs were manipulated to determine how these variables influenced self-protective motivation, intention to seek information, actual information seeking, knowledge acquisition, and behavioral intention. Results were mixed, but the risk x efficacy interaction was significantly related with three outcomes. Results are discussed in the context of the EPPM-based findings.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 27
Word count: 7823
Text sample:
The RPA Framework 1 Risk and Efficacy as Motivators of Change: Test of the Risk Perception Attitude (RPA) Framework Attempts to establish a causal relation between risk perception and health behavior have often led to confusing and even contradictory results. Some studies (Dolinski Gromski & Zawisza 1987; Larwood 1978; Weinstein 1982 1983; Weinstein Sandman & Roberts 1990) have found a positive correlation others (Joseph et al. 1987; Robertson 1977; Svenson Fischhoff & MacGregor 1985) have not and still others
& S. Schneider (Eds.) Primary prevention of AIDS (pp. 142-167). Beverly Hills CA: Sage. Weinstein N. D. Grubb P. D. & Vautier J. (1986). Increasing automobile seatbelt use: An intervention emphasizing risk susceptibility. Journal of Applied Psychology 71 285- 290. Weinstein N. D. Sandman P. M. & Roberts N. E. (1990). Determinants of self- protective behavior: Home radon testing. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 20 783- 801. Witte K. (1992). Putting the fear back into fear appeals: The extended


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