All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Representations of Muslim women and the veil: questions of image and voice
Unformatted Document Text:  Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA). It was, then, a tribute to Muslim women’s courage and determination in the face of life-threatening oppression. It also demonstrated sophisticated awareness of public relations and the power of communication technology that situates these women in a world familiar to us as belonging within modernity (in contrast to the declared pre-modern characteristics of Islamic societies). Yet, almost a year after the widespread distribution of these pictures, the British popular paper, The Mirror (19 June 2002), devoted extensive space to the story of the woman who was killed, but only a single paragraph to how the images were produced. Instead, the paper’s emphasis was on the gruelling account of the fate of ‘a woman beneath veils of violence, madness and terrible sadness’. When the burqa-clad women does get the opportunity to speak in her own voice, the impact is powerful. An award-winning documentary, Divorce Iranian Style (Kim Longinotto, Ziba Mir- Hosseini 1998), shot in Iran by an all-woman team and screened on British television (C4, 23 August 1999), depicts a number of articulate and assertive hijab-clad women pleading for divorce in a family court. The skill they exhibit in not merely stating their cases but in manoeuvring around the constraints of an oppressive system, confounds their ‘victim’ image. The general equation between ‘veil’ and ‘silence’ in Western discourses was further broken in an edition of the BBC2 current- affairs series, Correspondent, devoted to the plight of Afghan refugees in the wake of the ‘war on terror’ (‘The Dispossessed’, 20 January 2002). The film-maker, Taghi Amirani, travels to a Taliban-controlled refugee camp where he comes upon a young woman, Nafisa Sharifi (whose mother and younger sister have been killed in the bombing). She is

Authors: Macdonald, Myra.
first   previous   Page 10 of 15   next   last



background image
Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA). It was, then, a tribute
to Muslim women’s courage and determination in the face of life-threatening oppression.
It also demonstrated sophisticated awareness of public relations and the power of
communication technology that situates these women in a world familiar to us as
belonging within modernity (in contrast to the declared pre-modern characteristics of
Islamic societies). Yet, almost a year after the widespread distribution of these pictures,
the British popular paper, The Mirror (19 June 2002), devoted extensive space to the
story of the woman who was killed, but only a single paragraph to how the images were
produced. Instead, the paper’s emphasis was on the gruelling account of the fate of ‘a
woman beneath veils of violence, madness and terrible sadness’.
When the burqa-clad women does get the opportunity to speak in her own voice, the
impact is powerful. An award-winning documentary, Divorce Iranian Style (Kim
Longinotto, Ziba Mir- Hosseini 1998), shot in Iran by an all-woman team and screened
on British television (C4, 23 August 1999), depicts a number of articulate and assertive
hijab-clad women pleading for divorce in a family court. The skill they exhibit in not
merely stating their cases but in manoeuvring around the constraints of an oppressive
system, confounds their ‘victim’ image. The general equation between ‘veil’ and
‘silence’ in Western discourses was further broken in an edition of the BBC2 current-
affairs series, Correspondent, devoted to the plight of Afghan refugees in the wake of the
‘war on terror’ (‘The Dispossessed’, 20 January 2002). The film-maker, Taghi Amirani,
travels to a Taliban-controlled refugee camp where he comes upon a young woman,
Nafisa Sharifi (whose mother and younger sister have been killed in the bombing). She is


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 15   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.