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Borderland Selves: Rethinking Identity in Contemporary Global/Local Articulations
Unformatted Document Text:  describes how various societal components are organized into an event such as the Gulf War or a phenomenon like Madonna [...] Analysis of figures such as Madonna is important not only because she reveals the global reach of media culture, but because she exemplifies how issues such as race and sexuality are increasingly articulated through culture rather than politics in the narrow sense (16). Also grounded in the logic of relationality, athough this time drawing from Wittgenstein’s notion of “family resemblances”, Nicholson (1995) has taken a similar perspective to rethink the category of “women” beyond the restrictions of the thesis of “common denominator” underlying in many feminist analyses. The category of “women” – as well as any other marker of identity – should be understood, argues Nicholson, as having no underlying or connecting thread, no common denominator, but an ensemble of disparate elements that cohere relationally, a coherence that is the result of a network of overlapping relations and not of some underlying logic or intrinsic correspondence. Similarly, Gilroy has introduced the suggestive notion of “the social ecology of identification” to indicate the complex and interrelated character of identity formation over notions such as nation, race and ethnicity, hence introducing movement where before was fixity. Indeed, from this perspective is possible to capture the complex reality of “diaspora” identity, which for Gilroy represents one of the most salient identifications in today’s world, the “novel sociality of a new millennium where displacement, flight, exile and forced migration are likely to be a recurrent social phenomena...” (329). It also makes a contribution to the analysis of intercultural and transcultural processes and forms by opening up and marking the “historical and experiential rift between the place of residence and that of belonging.” (329). Diaspora in this sense provides, in my opinion, not only a useful model of analysis but also, and perhaps more importantly, a suggestive metaphor for rethinking the relation between identity and belonging. It underlines the basic claim that identity, as an

Authors: Correa, Andres.
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describes how various societal components are organized into an event such as the
Gulf War or a phenomenon like Madonna [...] Analysis of figures such as Madonna
is important not only because she reveals the global reach of media culture, but
because she exemplifies how issues such as race and sexuality are increasingly
articulated through culture rather than politics in the narrow sense (16).

Also grounded in the logic of relationality, athough this time drawing from
Wittgenstein’s notion of “family resemblances”, Nicholson (1995) has taken a similar
perspective to rethink the category of “women” beyond the restrictions of the thesis of
“common denominator” underlying in many feminist analyses. The category of “women” –
as well as any other marker of identity – should be understood, argues Nicholson, as having
no underlying or connecting thread, no common denominator, but an ensemble of disparate
elements that cohere relationally, a coherence that is the result of a network of overlapping
relations and not of some underlying logic or intrinsic correspondence.
Similarly, Gilroy has introduced the suggestive notion of “the social ecology of
identification” to indicate the complex and interrelated character of identity formation over
notions such as nation, race and ethnicity, hence introducing movement where before was
fixity. Indeed, from this perspective is possible to capture the complex reality of “diaspora”
identity, which for Gilroy represents one of the most salient identifications in today’s world,
the “novel sociality of a new millennium where displacement, flight, exile and forced
migration are likely to be a recurrent social phenomena...” (329). It also makes a
contribution to the analysis of intercultural and transcultural processes and forms by opening
up and marking the “historical and experiential rift between the place of residence and that
of belonging.” (329). Diaspora in this sense provides, in my opinion, not only a useful model
of analysis but also, and perhaps more importantly, a suggestive metaphor for rethinking the
relation between identity and belonging. It underlines the basic claim that identity, as an


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