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Between Terror and Trust: Patterns of Parent-Infant Communication in Play
Unformatted Document Text:  eating sounds. Rachel was happy and laughed. He repeated this four times and they both experience a peek moment of the game simultaneously. After that Guido began calming Rachel down (important for good emotional management). He said to Rachel: ”You know that I did not get enough turkey, so there you go … Hmmm. That little finger is really good.” In this case, he is explicitly pretending to be eating Rachel’s finger. Then he got her finger into his mouth again. “It is so good! What is --. Maybe I should put some gravy on it. That would be a good idea!” Then he stretched out his tongue and started licking Rachel’s finger. Rachel loved it. By talking, Guido started a winding down sequence. The point of the licking was that it ended the “eating” phase -- licking is friendly, thus deactivating the predator schema. A few second after Rachel touched Guido’s tongue second time, he said: “That’s my tongue. You touched my tongue. How about a few more peas?” He went back to feeding Rachel her dinner. Rachel understood that the game ended and started eating and playing with the keys again. We propose that what Guido and Rachel were really doing is deliberately activating Rachel’s predator schema, without consciously realizing this it. In the case of this pretend play the predator schema got activated and important terror management skills that Rachel will use later when playing chase, got practiced. A possible follow-up study would be to monitor Rachel’s and Guido’s hormones and heart beat changes during this play and see if and how they are affected by fear arousal. The data collected during the summer 2002 in the Czech Republic has good example of peek-a-boo and monster-face scaring, specifically observations of a young family in the chateau garden of the city of Slavkov. At one point Kyas noticed a young

Authors: Kyas, Jirina. and Steen, Francis.
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eating sounds. Rachel was happy and laughed. He repeated this four times and they both
experience a peek moment of the game simultaneously.
After that Guido began calming Rachel down (important for good emotional
management). He said to Rachel: ”You know that I did not get enough turkey, so there
you go … Hmmm. That little finger is really good.” In this case, he is explicitly
pretending to be eating Rachel’s finger. Then he got her finger into his mouth again. “It
is so good! What is --. Maybe I should put some gravy on it. That would be a good idea!”
Then he stretched out his tongue and started licking Rachel’s finger. Rachel loved it. By
talking, Guido started a winding down sequence. The point of the licking was that it
ended the “eating” phase -- licking is friendly, thus deactivating the predator schema. A
few second after Rachel touched Guido’s tongue second time, he said: “That’s my
tongue. You touched my tongue. How about a few more peas?” He went back to feeding
Rachel her dinner. Rachel understood that the game ended and started eating and playing
with the keys again.
We propose that what Guido and Rachel were really doing is deliberately
activating Rachel’s predator schema, without consciously realizing this it. In the case of
this pretend play the predator schema got activated and important terror management
skills that Rachel will use later when playing chase, got practiced. A possible follow-up
study would be to monitor Rachel’s and Guido’s hormones and heart beat changes during
this play and see if and how they are affected by fear arousal.
The data collected during the summer 2002 in the Czech Republic has good
example of peek-a-boo and monster-face scaring, specifically observations of a young
family in the chateau garden of the city of Slavkov. At one point Kyas noticed a young


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