All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Between Terror and Trust: Patterns of Parent-Infant Communication in Play
Unformatted Document Text:  of simulated terror. Such skills have an application to skills that establish a bridge back to our early evolutionary history, when it was a necessity of survival to practice evading predators in behavioral simulations. For an individual to be able to play games that develop the necessary skills to evade predators, he or she must first learn to handle the feelings of terror that such a practice must necessarily and by design arouse. By engaging in acts of scary pretense, the infant learns emotional self-regulation in the borderlands between reality and fiction. The function of the monster -- a conception which appears to be present in a broad range of cultures -- in biological terms, as a generic predator schema, is to orchestrate a massive flight response. This includes an overwhelming emotional arousal that is subjectively experienced as terror. The biological function of terror is to focus the mind and to harness all available resources at a maximum speed to escape the present danger. If pretending to be attacked by a monster, even in a game, is terrifying, this terror is an integral part of the simulation. Even so, for infants the pretend attack by a predator can be frightening to the point of paralysis. By practicing such simulated terror in very safe monster games, where the father’s acts are carefully calibrated to keep the child very precisely in its zone of proximal emotional and cognitive development and not overshoot it, even for a moment, the infant is able to build the necessary mental structures to handle these games with laughter rather than with fear. In this way, the father nurtures the development of the infant’s development in a precisely timed cooperative transaction. A skilful and sensitive parent constantly monitors the delicate borderline between adequate and overwhelming amount of terror in play. This borderland, we suggest, is pedagogically vital. On the one hand, the parent

Authors: Kyas, Jirina. and Steen, Francis.
first   previous   Page 6 of 17   next   last



background image
of simulated terror. Such skills have an application to skills that establish a bridge back to
our early evolutionary history, when it was a necessity of survival to practice evading
predators in behavioral simulations. For an individual to be able to play games that
develop the necessary skills to evade predators, he or she must first learn to handle the
feelings of terror that such a practice must necessarily and by design arouse. By
engaging in acts of scary pretense, the infant learns emotional self-regulation in the
borderlands between reality and fiction.
The function of the monster -- a conception which appears to be present in a
broad range of cultures -- in biological terms, as a generic predator schema, is to
orchestrate a massive flight response. This includes an overwhelming emotional arousal
that is subjectively experienced as terror. The biological function of terror is to focus the
mind and to harness all available resources at a maximum speed to escape the present
danger. If pretending to be attacked by a monster, even in a game, is terrifying, this
terror is an integral part of the simulation. Even so, for infants the pretend attack by a
predator can be frightening to the point of paralysis. By practicing such simulated terror
in very safe monster games, where the father’s acts are carefully calibrated to keep the
child very precisely in its zone of proximal emotional and cognitive development and not
overshoot it, even for a moment, the infant is able to build the necessary mental structures
to handle these games with laughter rather than with fear. In this way, the father nurtures
the development of the infant’s development in a precisely timed cooperative transaction.
A skilful and sensitive parent constantly monitors the delicate borderline between
adequate and overwhelming amount of terror in play.
This borderland, we suggest, is pedagogically vital. On the one hand, the parent


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 17   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.