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A Moderating Role of Channel Responsiveness in the Effects of Online Information Source

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Abstract:

A lack of regulation on the content and content providers of online information, particularly online health information, allows anyone including non-professionals to provide health information on the Internet. Potentially inaccurate and biased information provided by non-professionals and those with commercial intent may result in adverse effects on individuals’ health. In this study, we investigate if indication of a source of online health information can have positive effects on key health outcomes and if responsiveness of the information channel, the Web site, moderates the effects of source. Findings of the study show that effects of source and responsiveness of the Web site are contradictory to common expectations. Implications for government and commercial sources of online health information are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

sourc (207), inform (132), respons (115), web (100), effect (89), site (86), attitud (85), health (84), toward (77), particip (67), allergi (64), individu (62), interact (61), intent (53), manipul (51), behavior (51), communic (49), commerci (49), p (45), 1 (41), measur (40),

Author's Keywords:

responsiveness, source effects, online health information
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Kim, Hyojin. and Stephens, Keri. "A Moderating Role of Channel Responsiveness in the Effects of Online Information Source" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111459_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kim, H. and Stephens, K. K. , 2003-05-27 "A Moderating Role of Channel Responsiveness in the Effects of Online Information Source" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111459_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A lack of regulation on the content and content providers of online information, particularly online health information, allows anyone including non-professionals to provide health information on the Internet. Potentially inaccurate and biased information provided by non-professionals and those with commercial intent may result in adverse effects on individuals’ health. In this study, we investigate if indication of a source of online health information can have positive effects on key health outcomes and if responsiveness of the information channel, the Web site, moderates the effects of source. Findings of the study show that effects of source and responsiveness of the Web site are contradictory to common expectations. Implications for government and commercial sources of online health information are discussed.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 34
Word count: 9899
Text sample:
INTRODUCTION Convenience of user control a wealth of information and anonymity has led the Internet to be a primary information seeking and gathering tool (Flanagin & Metzger 2000b; Pew Research Center 2000). Research has showed that individuals rely on the Internet “to get information” far more than other communication channels such as books magazines television newspapers the telephone e-mail and face-to-face communication (Flanagin & Metzger 2000a). While more Internet users seek non-news information than news or political information on
Kim H. (2001). Enhancing learning through use interactive tools on health-related Websites. Health Education Research 16 721-733. Walther J. B. & Burgoon J. K. (1992). Relational Communication In Computer- Mediated Interaction. Human Communication Research 19 50-88. Wilson E. J. & Sherrell D. L. (1993). Source effects in communication and persuasion research: A meta-analysis of effect size. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 21 101- 112. Wu G. (1999). Perceived interactivity and attitude toward Web site. Proceedings From The


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