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A Challenge to the Duel: Socializing Dedicated Virtual Reality Fans to the Ideology of Textualism
Unformatted Document Text:  A Challenge to the Duel 10 broken that agreement. The team that kept the bargain felt this was dishonorable and turned the backs of their Mechs to the other team and destroyed themselves by ammo bay fire. After the mission, the other team apologized for breaking the agreement. (Pilot 30) Although the honor system is the key behind the Pilot’s Code, the rules are sometimes adjudicated through game play, as the past two excerpts have illustrated. Structural controls are used to impose normative expectations of the use of this technology. Furthermore, the face-to-face contact that people have immediately after a game acts as another control on the behavior of pilots. But it also shows the amount of consensus and the power in which players have to address violations. Several tricks are widely considered off-limits and pilots who practice them are shunned. "Narfing," for example, is considered dishonorable. Narfing is when a pilot hangs around the outskirts of battle and then intentionally intervenes to pick up a kill that was prepared by another pilot. Those who practice narfing might not be able to find players who will include them in a game. "In the latter days of the (Virtual World Stores), there was little if any "cheating" or going against the Pilot’s Code because it was spread around the community who did what." (Pilot 30) In a multiplayer game at an entertainment center, a shunned player can no longer play, except at a lower level. Playing at an advanced level requires players to learn the resources and interact according to custom. This example shows how the pilots themselves use the structural controls available to them to make each game fit with the context and social conditions that give the texts their transparency. But creativity is not

Authors: Tew, Chad.
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A Challenge to the Duel
10
broken that agreement. The team that kept the bargain felt this was
dishonorable and turned the backs of their Mechs to the other team and
destroyed themselves by ammo bay fire. After the mission, the other team
apologized for breaking the agreement. (Pilot 30)
Although the honor system is the key behind the Pilot’s Code, the rules are sometimes
adjudicated through game play, as the past two excerpts have illustrated. Structural
controls are used to impose normative expectations of the use of this technology.
Furthermore, the face-to-face contact that people have immediately after a game
acts as another control on the behavior of pilots. But it also shows the amount of
consensus and the power in which players have to address violations. Several tricks are
widely considered off-limits and pilots who practice them are shunned. "Narfing," for
example, is considered dishonorable. Narfing is when a pilot hangs around the outskirts
of battle and then intentionally intervenes to pick up a kill that was prepared by another
pilot. Those who practice narfing might not be able to find players who will include them
in a game.

"In the latter days of the (Virtual World Stores), there was little if any
"cheating" or going against the Pilot’s Code because it was spread around
the community who did what." (Pilot 30)
In a multiplayer game at an entertainment center, a shunned player can no longer play,
except at a lower level. Playing at an advanced level requires players to learn the
resources and interact according to custom. This example shows how the pilots
themselves use the structural controls available to them to make each game fit with the
context and social conditions that give the texts their transparency. But creativity is not


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