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A Challenge to the Duel: Socializing Dedicated Virtual Reality Fans to the Ideology of Textualism
Unformatted Document Text:  A Challenge to the Duel 4 "nontrivial effort is required to allow the reader to traverse the text" 5 In contrast to those who study ergodic textuality, this study focuses on a different level of textuality. My primary concern is with the social interaction among agents, including their influence or intentionality. 6 While the study of ergodic literature has focused on the decontextualization of literature in new forms, namely the variety of interactive computing texts, this study examines the recontextualization of the virtual reality game in the institutional context of popular culture. What is the difference in practical terms? Marie-Laure Ryan, who writes within the ergodic perspective, suggests our standard notion of audience reception for a literary text is challenged when readers are presented with a different narrative event in each experience and they must reconcile those presentations with the experience of the text. In her view, interpretations are linked to the individual’s activation of the experience. 7 But at the level of textuality treated here, audience members must coordinate their interpretations with others who have a different experience of the text. This activity creates a communal understanding of their experience as a seemingly transparent reading of the event. This level of textuality allows a focus on the ideology of textualism, of which transparency is only one aspect. At this level of textuality we can explore the significance of poetic and popular technologies in relationship to other institutions and uses. What means are available in popular culture for the dispersal of power that Foucault suggests? Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban describe the larger culture’s ideology of textualism. 8 This is the belief that texts are fixed in their stable forms, our interpretations of them are transparent, and they are context free. Although it is a widespread sociocultural belief, institutions socialize their members to use them in that manner. For example, Elizabeth Metz describes how law students are trained in a form of textualism

Authors: Tew, Chad.
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A Challenge to the Duel
4
"nontrivial effort is required to allow the reader to traverse the text"
5
In contrast to those
who study ergodic textuality, this study focuses on a different level of textuality. My
primary concern is with the social interaction among agents, including their influence or
intentionality.
6
While the study of ergodic literature has focused on the
decontextualization of literature in new forms, namely the variety of interactive
computing texts, this study examines the recontextualization of the virtual reality game in
the institutional context of popular culture. What is the difference in practical terms?
Marie-Laure Ryan, who writes within the ergodic perspective, suggests our standard
notion of audience reception for a literary text is challenged when readers are presented
with a different narrative event in each experience and they must reconcile those
presentations with the experience of the text. In her view, interpretations are linked to the
individual’s activation of the experience.
7
But at the level of textuality treated here,
audience members must coordinate their interpretations with others who have a different
experience of the text. This activity creates a communal understanding of their
experience as a seemingly transparent reading of the event. This level of textuality allows
a focus on the ideology of textualism, of which transparency is only one aspect. At this
level of textuality we can explore the significance of poetic and popular technologies in
relationship to other institutions and uses. What means are available in popular culture for
the dispersal of power that Foucault suggests?
Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban describe the larger culture’s ideology of
textualism.
8
This is the belief that texts are fixed in their stable forms, our interpretations
of them are transparent, and they are context free. Although it is a widespread
sociocultural belief, institutions socialize their members to use them in that manner. For
example, Elizabeth Metz describes how law students are trained in a form of textualism


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