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Applying CMC Theoreis to Assess Virtual Community
Unformatted Document Text:  CMC Theories and Virtual Community 7 greater anonymity created by CMC tends to lead more equal participation among people, less hierarchy, less dominating conversation pattern. Negative outcomes were also reported such as framing, taking more time to make decision, difficulty to get consensus among people and so forth. (McGraith & Hollingshead, 1994). While the “cue-filtered-out” approach has produced numerous research which has contributed to understanding of human interaction and performance using CMC, it is criticized that most of the research was done in experimental setting which often lacks of dynamics of interaction from the real-world. In the typical “cue-filtered-out” research design, small groups are brought into experimental research facilities equipped to facilitate computer conferencing (Baym, 2001). Experimental settings often have differences from real world settings such as composition of participants and group structures, nature of tasks to be solved, time allowed to solve the task, assessment of the outcome, and so forth (McGrath & Hollingshead, 1994; Walther, 1992, 1995). Another criticism for this “cue-filtered-out” approach is that by asserting that structure of medium determines the nature and interpretation of messages, it fails to pay attention to dynamics of human interaction and its byproducts such as development of relationships, norms and rules, and any possible changes over time (Walther, 1995). Some propose that, in addition to the inherent properties of the media itself, the social contexts which are embedded in the groups should be considered to determine the impact of different media on individuals (Markus, 1994). For example, although face- to-face discussions seem most appropriate for performing unstructured and ambiguous tasks, some groups may develop norms that help convey more meaning through “lean” medium. In a similar vein, Fulk, Schmitz and Steinfield (1990) went beyond arguing that the objective utility of technology is far less important in determining how it is used

Authors: Chung, Siyoung.
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CMC Theories and Virtual Community
7
greater anonymity created by CMC tends to lead more equal participation among people,
less hierarchy, less dominating conversation pattern. Negative outcomes were also
reported such as framing, taking more time to make decision, difficulty to get consensus
among people and so forth. (McGraith & Hollingshead, 1994).
While the “cue-filtered-out” approach has produced numerous research which
has contributed to understanding of human interaction and performance using CMC, it
is criticized that most of the research was done in experimental setting which often lacks
of dynamics of interaction from the real-world. In the typical “cue-filtered-out” research
design, small groups are brought into experimental research facilities equipped to
facilitate computer conferencing (Baym, 2001). Experimental settings often have
differences from real world settings such as composition of participants and group
structures, nature of tasks to be solved, time allowed to solve the task, assessment of the
outcome, and so forth (McGrath & Hollingshead, 1994; Walther, 1992, 1995). Another
criticism for this “cue-filtered-out” approach is that by asserting that structure of
medium determines the nature and interpretation of messages, it fails to pay attention to
dynamics of human interaction and its byproducts such as development of relationships,
norms and rules, and any possible changes over time (Walther, 1995).
Some propose that, in addition to the inherent properties of the media itself, the
social contexts which are embedded in the groups should be considered to determine the
impact of different media on individuals (Markus, 1994). For example, although face-
to-face discussions seem most appropriate for performing unstructured and ambiguous
tasks, some groups may develop norms that help convey more meaning through “lean”
medium. In a similar vein, Fulk, Schmitz and Steinfield (1990) went beyond arguing
that the objective utility of technology is far less important in determining how it is used


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